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The Endocrine Disorder in America NO ONE is Talking About

  
  
  

thyroid resized 600There are currently about 25 million Americans diagnosed with some sort of thyroid disorder.  Thyroid disorders tend to be more prominent in women and the probability of a thyroid disorder occurring is four times more likely in women than in men. 

 

What exactly is the thyroid?

  • A butterfly shaped gland in the neck
  • Makes T3 , T4 and calcitonin (calcium regulating hormone)

Symptoms of a Thyroid disorder

  • Weight gain, even though you are not eating more food.
  • Increased sensitivity to cold.
  • Constipation.
  • Muscle weakness.
  • Joint or muscle pain.
  • Depression.
  • Fatigue (feeling very tired)
  • Pale dry skin.

Watch SpectraCell's webinar on
Integrative Diagnostics for Managing the Thyroid HERE                                                  

Contact our bloggers at spec1@spectracell.com.

The Role of Nutrition in Hormonal Health

  
  
  

Hormone Balance Logo resized 600Micronutrients profoundly affect hormonal health.  It is difficult to achieve hormonal balance if micronutrient status is inadequate, and like nutrients, hormones affect cellular metabolism, energy production, detoxification efficiency and mental health so balance is Key. 

Like nutrients, hormones influence all aspects of health and disease - mood, sleep, metabolism, immunity, heart health and appearance.  An imbalance of one hormone can initiate a cascade of events that alters other hormones.  
  • Fatigue & Energy Levels
  • Cardiovascular health (Blood pressure, clotting, lipids)
  • Neurology (migraines, sleep, pain)
  • Mental Health (depression, anxiety, cognitive function)
  • Immunity (infections, autoimmune disease)
  • Metabolism (blood sugar regulation, tissue repair)
  • Bone density (Osteoporosis)
  • Physical appearance (skin, muscles, hair)
SpectraCell Laboratories offers comprehensive male and female hormone panels that reveal the overall state of hormonal balance in a patient.

A comprehensive look at your hormone status is key.

GET TESTED!

Contact our bloggers at spec1@spectracell.com.

SpectraCell Launches NEW Products!

  
  
  

spectracell, hormones, micronutrient, genetics, cardioAt SpectraCell Laboratories we are always looking for ways to look at the overall health of a patient and in turn providing you with the tools necessary to provide a customized treatment plan where the focus is "Balance is Key" to healthy living.

SpectraCell Laboratories, the leader in functional nutritional testing is proud to announce the launch of our new comprehensive hormone testing and CardioMetabolic with a Pre-diabetes panel to its menu. Below you will find a brief description of each of the tests we are now offering to our clients.     

CARDIOMETABOLIC TESTING 

SpectraCell Laboratories, primarily known for its functional nutritional testing, now offers a complete Cardiometabolic Panel to measure risk of heart disease and diabetes.   The new panel, which includes SpectraCell’s advanced Lipoprotein Particle Profile™,   reports several clinically relevant biomarkers in three areas:  (1) Glycemic control  (2) Lipid Metabolism and (3) Vascular Inflammation.  Each patient is given a pre-diabetic risk score ranging from 1 to 8 depending on their results. As a clinician, you can monitor both their specific biomarkers as well as their composite risk and treat accordingly.  Assessing cardiometabolic function is the first step in treating it. 

HORMONE TESTING

Complete male and female panels are now available.  Both end-point steroid hormones as well as precursor hormones are included so the precise place of imbalance in the complicated hormonal cascade can be pinpointed.  Several peptide hormones are also included as well as a complete thyroid panel, including thyroid antibody testing.  Like nutrients, an imbalance of one hormone can initiate a cascade of events that alters other hormones, so a comprehensive look at hormone status is essential.

For more information on our new tests or to receive a product guide booklet, complete form

Contact our bloggers at spec1@spectracell.com.

Zinc, the MINERAL you should know about

  
  
  

The primary role of zinc is to activate almost 200zinc enzymes with vital roles in cell regulation, immune function, acid/base balance, DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis, lipid metabolism, eicosanoid production, and digestion.

Zinc also is a component of insulin (energy metabolism), thymic hormones (immune function) and gustin (taste acuity).

Deficiency  Symptoms:

Symptoms of zinc deficiency include fatigue, dermatitis, acne, loss of taste, poor wound healing, anorexia, decreased immunity, delayed growth, hypogonadism and delayed sexual maturation, diarrhea, skeletal abnormalities, alopecia, behavioral disturbances, white spots on fingernails, infertility and night blindness.

Those at risk for zinc deficiency include alcoholics, malnourished, malabsorption (Crohn’s Disease, celiac disease), long-term  parenteral nutrition, chronic renal disease, anorexics, dieters, pregnant women, elderly, and sickle-cell disease.

Repletion  Information:

Dietary sources rich in Zinc (per serving) are:

  • Red Meats                              
  • Wheat Germ
  • Seeds                                   
  • Nuts
  • Soybean Products                
  • Legumes
  • Potatoes                                  
  • Zinc-Fortified Cereal Products

Compounds found in meats enhance absorption of zinc from plant sources.

Download SpectraCell's Nutrient Correlation Wheel on Hypothyroidism, fatigue and weight management all showing the correlation with these have with zinc deficiency.

GET TESTED!

Contact our bloggers at spec1@spectracell.com.

A Look at Carnitine

  
  
  

anatomy of nutrition blank resized 600

L-carnitine is an amino acid derivative of the essential amino acids L-lysine and methonine. The conversion to carnitine requires niacin (B3), vitamins B6 and C, and iron.  It is found in nearly all cells of the body but chiefly in the liver and kidney.  Carnitine is essential for the transportation of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membranes in the mitochondria, where they are metabolized by beta-oxidation to produce biological energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

L- carnitine also is required to remove short- and medium-chain fatty acids from the mitochondria.  This removal optimized energy production by maintaining coenzyme A at optimal levels for normal metabolism and energy production.

Deficiency Symptoms:

Deficiencies of carnitine may result from 1) deficiencies of essential amino acids lysine and methionine, 2) deficiencies of cofactors (B3, C, B6 and iron), 3) defective gastrointestinal function, 4) increased requirement because of high-fat diet, metabolic stress or disease.  The consequences of carnitine deficiency are impaired lipid metabolism and lipid accumulation in skeletal muscles, heart and liver. Patients usually exhibit muscle weakness and fatigue.

Normal heart function depends on adequate concentrations of carnitine.  While the normal heart stores more carnitine than required, if the heart does not have a good oxygen supply, carnitine levels quickly decrease.  This lack of oxygen leads to decreased energy production and increased risk for angina and heart disease.  Carnitine benefits blood lipids by lowering triglycerides and total cholesterol, while increasing HDL.  L-acetylcarnitine (LAC) may be useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, senile depression and age-related memory loss.

Download the nutrient correlation chart on Fibromyalgia, Pain and Testosterone all include a deficiency in carnitine.

GET TEST TODAY!

Contact our bloggers at spec1@spectracell.com.

Magnesium, Vital for Proper Cell Function

  
  
  

Magnesium is predominantly found intracellularly, wheremagnesium it is vital for proper cell functions. Magnesium is the second most prevalent intracellular cation (after potassium).  Magnesium functions are numerous and essential, including enzyme activation (over 300 types), neuromuscular activity, membrane transport and interactions, energy metabolism (carbohydrates, fats, proteins), and roles in calcium and phosphorus metabolism. 

Deficiency  Symptoms

Deficiency symptoms are both acute (Trouseau and Chvostek signs, muscle spasms, tetany, cardia arrythmias, ataxia, vertigo, convulsions, organic brain syndrome) and chronic (thrombophlebitis, hemolytic anemia, bone loss, depressed immune function, poor wound healing, hyper irritability, burxism, hyperlipidemia, fatigue, hypertension). Those at risk for Magnesium deficiency include:  malabsorption, malnourished, alcoholics, diabetics, diuretic therapy, children, elderly, pregnant and lactating women, post menopausal women with osteoperosis, athletes, digitalis therapy, long-term therapy with antibiotics, chemotherapeutic and immunosuppressive medications.  In addition, the following diseases are associated with Magnesium deficiency:  cardiovascular disease, cirrhosis, renal disease, parathyroid diseases, thyroid conditions.

Repletion  Information
Dietary sources richest in Magnesium (per serving) are:
  • Nutritional Supplements  
  • Seeds (especially  pumpkin)
  • Nuts 
  • Soybeans
  • Whole Grains     
  • Potatoes
  • Legumes
  • Fresh Vegetables
Watch or download Dr. Grabowski's presentation on "Connecting the Nutrients" here

Get Tested Today!

 

Contact our bloggers at spec1@spectracell.com.

The Need for Glutathione

  
  
  

glutathioneGlutathione is implicated in many cellular function including antioxidant protection and detoxification. It is also essential for the maintenance of cell membrane integrity in red blood cells. Intracellular glutathione concentrations are principally derived by intracellular synthesis, as few cells directly uptake glutathione from the surrounding extracellular fluid.  The high concentration of glutathione in virtually all cells clearly indicates its importance in metabolic and oxidative detoxification processes.  Glutathione may be considered the preeminent antioxidant. 

Deficiency Symptoms

A wide range of human conditions such as aging, cancer, atherosclerosis, arthritis, viral infections, AIDS, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases and pulmonary diseases may be produced or made worse by "free radicals." Their treatment or prevention often includes antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, carotenoids and selenium.  Glutathione is an essential component of the antioxidant defense system: producing a "sparing effect" for both tocopherol and ascorbate by reducing the oxidized forms, and by eliminating hydrogen peroxide by reacting with glutathione peroxidase.  Cellular glutathione functions to decrease the formation of oxidized LDL, implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. T-lymphocytes become deficient in glutathione in the progression of AIDS which impairs immune function.  Glutathione is also required for the synthesis of some prostaglandins from n-3 and n-6 polyunstaturated fatty acids which are important in the inflammatory response.  Patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome are favorably affected by treatments that increase cellular glutathione.

Download our Nutrient Function and Deficiency symptoms handout here.

GET TESTED TODAY!

Contact our bloggers at spec1@spectracell.com.

The role Copper plays in YOUR body

  
  
  

copperLike most trace minerals, copper acts as an enzyme cofactor in several key metabolic processes in the body.  Among its many functions, copper aids in the formation of bone, hemoglobin and red blood cells, therefore enabling the efficient transport of oxygen throughout the body. 

In addition, copper works in balance with vitamin C and zinc to manufacture elastin (skin protein) as well as collagen and other structural proteins in cartilage and tendons.  It is also involved in the healing process, energy production, hair and skin coloring (production of melanin) and taste sensitivity. 

Copper stimulates the absorption of iron through the copper transport protein ceruloplasmin.  Copper also aids in the metabolism of several fatty acids and helps prevent oxidative damage by serving as a cofactor to superoxide dismutase.  In addition, copper is needed for proper insulation (mylination) of nerve cells and serves as a cofactor for the synthesis of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine.

Deficiency Symptoms:

Due to copper's role in the formation of collagen, copper deficiency can manifest as osteoporosis.  Other possible signs of deficiency include anemia (due to its role in hemoglobin formation), baldness, diarrhea, general weakness, impaired respiratory function, myelopathy, decreased skin pigment, reduced resistance to infection and increased triglyceride levels.  Evidence also links copper deficiency with increased oxidative damage to cell membranes.

Download SpectraCell's Nutrient Correlation Chart on Inflammation and Hypertension, both handouts provide information as to how important is Copper in maintaining overall health.

Check your Copper levels and all other essential vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and how your immune system is performing. Stop Guessing, Start Testing!

GET TESTED!

 

Contact our bloggers at spec1@spectracell.com.

Chromium an Essential Mineral YOU Need to Know About!

  
  
  

Chromium is an essential trace mineral that plays an chromium resized 600important role in optimizing insulin function and the regulation of blood glucose levels. Chromium may also be anti-atherogenic and assist in lowering cholesterol. 

Following food intake, blood glucose levels rise causing insulin to be secreted by the pancreas. Insulin lowers blood glucose levels by increasing the rate at which glucose enters a person's cells.  Chromium is believed to facilitate the attachment of insulin to the cell's insulin receptors.  Studies also indicate that chromium participates in cholesterol metabolism, suggesting a role for this mineral in maintaining normal blood cholesterol levels and preventing atherosclerosis.  Chromium also plays a role in nucleic acid synthesis.

Deficiency Symptoms:

Due to the processing methods that remove most of the naturally occurring chromium from commonly consumed foods, dietary deficiency of chromium is believed to be widespread in the United States.  Chromium deficiency may increase the likelihood of insulin resistance, a condition in which the cells of the body do not respond to the presence of insulin.  Insulin resistance can lead to elevated blood levels of insulin (hyperinsulinemia) and elevated blood levels of glucose, which can ultimately cause heart disease and/or diabetes.  Deficiency of chromium is associated with metabolic syndrome.  Metabolic syndrome represents a constellation of symptoms, including hyperinsulinemia, high blood pressure, high triglyceride levels, high blood sugar levels and low HDL cholesterol levels.  These symptoms increase one's risk for heart disease.  Low levels of chromium are also associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease incidence and mortality. 

Chromium deficiency correlates with depressed nucleic acid synthesis.  Chromium is essential for maintaining the structural stability of proteins and nucleic acids.  Animal studies have also found that this element is also vital for healthy fetal growth and development.  Studies on humans have established that premature infants born full-term. Others have found that multiparous women (women who've given birth two or more times) have far lower body chromium levels compared to nulliparae (women who've never given birth).  These findings suggest that chromium is an essential trace element during fetal growth and development.

Download our Nutrient Chart and the Nutrient Correlation Chart on Diabetes, both handouts provide information as to how important is Chromium.

Check your chromium levels and all other essential vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and how your immune system is performing.

GET TESTED!

 

Contact our bloggers at spec1@spectracell.com.

Calcium the MOST abundant mineral in the body!

  
  
  

Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body, withcalcium 99% residing in bones and teeth. As a component of hard tissues, calcium fulfills a structural role to maintain body size and act as attachments for musculoskeletal tissues. The remaining 1% of calcium is present in blood and soft tissues.

Functions of non-skeletal calcium include: enzyme activation, second messenger roles (transmitting hormonal information), blood clotting, cell and cell organelle membrane function (stabilization and transport), nerve impulse transmission and muscular contraction, tone, and irritability. Calcium levels in the blood are maintained within very strict limits by dietary intake, hormonal regulation and a rapidly exchangeable pool in bone tissue.

Deficiency Symptoms:

Calcium deficiencies are both acute and chronic. Acute calcium deficiency relates to lack of ionized calcium, causing increased muscular and nervous irritability, muscle spasms, muscle cramps and tetany. Chronic calcium deficiency manifests as bone loss disorders (osteoporosis, osteomalacia in adults, rickets in children), tooth decay, periodontal disease, depression and possibly hypertension. Those at risk for calcium deficiency include: malnourished, malabsorption and bone loss disorders. Conditions which are known to decrease calcium uptake or distribution are: decreased gastric acidity, vitamin D deficiency, high fat diets, high oxalate intake from rhubarb, spinach, chard and beet greens, high phytic acid intake from whole grains, high fiber intake, immobilization, faster gastrointestinal motility, psychological stress, thiazide diuretic therapy, aluminum compounds (aluminum-containing antacids, drugs, some parenteral feeding solutions).

View our webinar on Clinical Implications of vitamin D and calcium deficiencies, as well as download a copy of this case study highlighting 52 year old female with muscle aches all include a deficiency in calcium.

GET TESTED!

Contact our bloggers at spec1@spectracell.com.
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