SpectraCell Blog

Are you deficient in vitamin B3(Niacinamide)?

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, Aug 21, 2013 @ 11:00 AM

Vitamin B3, also known as Niacin, is a water solubledescribe the image vitamin. It is not stored in the body, so we need to consume it daily. We need niacin for proper digestive function. Vitamin B3(Niacinamide) is needed to metabolize food into energy.  Niacinamide is converted into the coenzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and NADP, which function in oxidation-reduction reactions essential for release of energy from carbohydrates, fats and proteins.  Niacin can also be synthesized by the body from tryptophan, although with low efficiency.

Deficiency Symptoms:

  • Anorexia
  • Muscular fatigue
  • Indigestion
  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Headaches
  • Glossitis
  • Skin Lesions

Severe Deficiency Symptoms:

  • Pellagra
  • Dermatitis
  • Dementia
  • Diarrhea
  • Tremors and Sores

Repletion Information:

Dietary sources of niacinamide are expressed as niacin equivalents, taking into account tryptophan's contribution.  Richest sources (per serving) include:

  • Nutritional Supplements
  • Meats
  • Enriched Cereals
  • Nutritional Yeasts
  • Legumes (including peanuts)
  • Potatoes
Case study where a patient demonstrated a deficiency in vitamin Bs, click here to read, also you can download a copy of the Nutrient correlation chart on Dyslipidemia and Insomnia

Interested in finding your micronutrient levels, please click here

Topics: SpectraCell, B Vitamins, Depression, micronutrient test, micronutrient, Vitamin B3, Niacin

Is vitamin B2(Riboflavin) important? YES

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, Aug 14, 2013 @ 01:46 PM

Vitamin B2 more commonly known as vitamin B2Riboflavin is a micronutrient with a key role in maintaining health.  Vitamin B2(Riboflavin) helps to metabolize foodstuffs into energy.  Riboflavin(vitamin B2) is converted into its active forms, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN).  FAD and FMN are primarily involved as cofactors in oxidation-reduction reactions for flavoproteins, essential for cellular energy production and respiration.  Vitamin B2(Riboflavin) has a role in antioxidant status by activating glutathione reductase, which regenerates reduced glutathione.


Vitamin B2(Riboflavin) Deficiency Symptoms:

  • Depression
  • Dizziness
  • sore or burning lips, mouth and tongue
  • Photophobia
  • Burning, itching or teary eyes
  • Loss of visual acuity

Severe vitamin B2 Deficiency symptoms:

  • Dermatitis
  • Cheilosis
  • Angular stomatitis
  • Corneal vascularization
Download SpectraCell's Nutrition Correlation chart referencing the correlation between vitamin B2(Riboflavin) with Depression as well as our Nutrient Depletion Chart
Click here to view our webinar on how nutrition can cure depression.

Interested in finding out your micronutrient levels, click here

Topics: SpectraCell, Vitamins, Case Study, Depression, micronutrient, vitamin deficiencies

How important IS vitamin B1(Thiamin)?

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, Aug 07, 2013 @ 10:15 AM

Vitamin B1(thiamin) is a water-soluble vitamin of the 8 B complex vitamin B1(thiamin)vitamins. All B vitamins help the body convert food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose), which is used to produce energy. The B vitamins, also help the body metabolize fats and protein. B complex vitamins are needed for healthy skin, hair, eyes, and liver. They also help the nervous system function properly, and are needed for good brain function.

Vitamin B1(Thiamin) is used by cells to help make energy from foodstuffs. Thiamin pyrophosphate is a cofactor for dehydrogenase enzymes with key roles in cellular energy production.  Thiamin pyrophosphate is required for transketolase activity, which is a component of the pentose phosphate pathway, the sole source for the synthesis of ribose used in synthesis of the nucleic acids (DNA and RNA).  These reactions also produce the major source of cellular NADPH (used in fatty acid biosynthesis and other pathways). Thiamin triphosphate is localized in nerve cell membranes, and plays a role in transmission of nervous impulses and acetylcholine synthesis.

Deficiency symptoms:

Early vitamin B1(thiamin) deficiency leads to clinical signs of:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Irritability
  • Fatigue
  • Constipation
  • Mental depression
  • Nausea
  • Peripheral Neuropathy 

Clinical signs of more severe thiamin deficiency (Wernicke-Korsafoff Syndrome):

  • Mental confusion
  • Loss of eye coordination
  • Loss of fine motor control
  • Weakness

Those at risk for vitamin B1(Thiamin) deficiency include:

  • Patients suffering from malnutrition, starvation or malabsorptin syndromes
  • Alcoholics
  • Patients on restricted diets
  • Gastric partitioning surgery
  • Thiamin-Responsive
  • Prolonged hemodialysis (pregnancy, lactation, fever, infection, trauma)
  • Elderly
  • Patients with an increased metabolic rate
  • Inherited
  • Metabolic Disorders

Repletion Information:

Dietary sources richest in B1 (per serving) include:

  • Nutritional supplements
  • Rice Bran
  • Pork enriched grain & grain products (cereals)
  • Nutritional Yeasts
  • Wheat Germ
  • Legumes (beans, peas, soybeans, lentils
Download SpectraCell's nutrition correlation reference chart referencing Vitamin B1(Thiamin)'s role in Fibromyalgia, Insomnia and Pain.
View our webinar on "Nutritional Considerations of Fibromyalgia" which discusses vitamin B1 as well as many other nutrients that play a vital role in fibromyalgia.

For more information on how to check your vitamin levels click here.

Topics: SpectraCell, B Vitamins, Fatigue, DNA, Case Study, Diet, Nervous System, Vitamin B1, skin disorder, reference chart, loss of appetite, constipation, nausea, irritability, weakness, mental confusion, thiamin

Vitamin A - How does it AFFECT YOU!

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Thu, Aug 01, 2013 @ 11:47 AM

Vitamin A is a group of nutritionally unsaturated hydrocarbons. Different forms of the vitamin vitamin A include retinol, retinoic acid, and carotenoids. Retinol is the most biologically active form of vitamin A and is synthesized by pro-vitamin A(beta-carotene). Vitamin A regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, immune function and apoptosis (cell death).  This vitamin plays a vital role in night or low-light vision and color vision among many other common functions.

Symptoms of vitamin A deficiency - Impaired immune function; eye or skin problems; compromised cell growth and development; fat malabsorption; night blindness; zinc deficiency; insomnia.

Common conditions associated with vitamin A deficiency - Hormone balance, Immunidex, Insomnia, night blindness.

CASE STUDY highlights a common problem with a vitamin A deficiency. A 45 year old female with multiple conditions such as hypertension, insomnia and GERD, click here.

View our webinars Nutritional Considerations of Hormone Balance and Nutritional Considerations of Skin disorders, which references vitamin A deficiency among others in these conditions. 

To check your micronutrient levels or to get started click here

Topics: SpectraCell, micronutrients, micronutrient testing, Cancer, cancer cells, autoimmune diseases, zinc, Vitamin A, Migraines, Heart Disease, pregnancy, Multivitamins, immune system, E-zinc, breast cancer, Fertility, PMS, deficiencies, Case Study, Headache, Dr. Ron Grabowski, deficiency, Depression, degenerative illness, micronutrient test, Cancer Prevention, Hypothyroidism, Hormones, Menopause, HSVI, GERD, mitral valve prolapse, infertility, Immunidex, eczema and nutrition, Women's Health