SpectraCell Blog

Protecting Our Telomeres with Targeted Nutrition and Lifestyle Changes

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Fri, Aug 10, 2018 @ 03:29 PM

healthy girlMost people may not realize that there are two fundamental ways to protect telomeres:  (1) reduce the rate at which they shorten, also known as decreasing the telomere attrition rate and (2) to actually lengthen telomeres. Although it is commonly, albeit somewhat incorrectly, believed that once telomeres shorten they cannot get longer, recent evidence suggests otherwise. Common sense lifestyle choices can actually lengthen telomeres. This is comparable to reversing aging, versus simply slowing it down. For example, in a study started a decade ago, a group of men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer agreed to undergo comprehensive lifestyle changes for five years and be monitored during the course of the study. The lifestyle changes involved increased exercise, better nutrition, and better management of psychological stress - all choices within the reach of every person. After five years, telomere length improved. 

For those who want to take protection of their telomeres to the next level, targeted nutrition is key.  The effect micronutrients have on telomeres is profound.  For example:

CalciumRequired cofactor to prevent DNA replication errors.

FolateInfluences telomere length via DNA methylation.

Vitamin B3Extends lifespan of human cells in vitro; Slows telomere attrition rate by reducing reactive oxygen species in mitochondria.

B2, B6 and B12Crucial for proper DNA methylation.

CysteineStem cell treatment with N-acetyl cysteine corrects DNA damage in telomeres.

ZincImportant cofactor for DNA repair enzymes; key role in regulating inflammation.

CopperKey cofactor in the potent antioxidant superoxide dismutase that is known to protect telomeres.

MagnesiumInduced deficiency shortened telomeres in rat livers; Regulates chromosome separation in cell replication.

SeleniumIn vitro supplementation extended telomere length in liver cells; selenoproteins protect DNA.

GlutathioneInterference of glutathione dependent antioxidant defenses accelerates telomere erosion.

Vitamin CProtects DNA from oxidation. In vitro studies show it slows down age-related telomere shortening in human skin cells.

 Vitamin EEnhances DNA repair as well as removal of damaged DNA; Shown in vitro to restore telomere length on human cells.

Vitamin DPositively associated with telomere length due to its anti-inflammatory role.

ManganeseRequired cofactor in Mn superoxide dismutase, a deficiency in which decreases telomerase activity.

 

Discover how you can improve your telomere length with Micronutrient testing. 

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References:

Ornish et al. Increased telomerase activity and comprehensive lifestyle changes: a pilot study. Lancet Oncol. 2008;9:1048-57. 

Ornish et al. Effect of comprehensive lifestyle changes on telomerase activity and telomere length in men with biopsy-proven low-risk prostate cancer: 5-year follow-up of a descriptive pilot study. Lancet Oncol. 2013;14:1112-1120.

 

Topics: Micronutrients and Telomere Length, Cellular Age, Telomere Homeostatis, Age Management, Longer Telomeres

Telomere Homeostasis: Live Better, Longer!

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Fri, Aug 03, 2018 @ 02:01 PM

TelomereTelomeres are sections of genetic material that form a protective cap at the end of each chromosome in every cell of the body. When a cell divides, the telomere gets a tiny bit shorter, until there is no more telomere left to protect DNA from “unraveling,” and the cell dies. Cellular death causes the body to age, whether the cell is from cardiac muscle, skin, or brain tissue, thus making telomeres a novel biomarker for biological age. The longer one’s telomeres, the younger one’s biological age. Several things affect telomere attrition rate – both positive (good nutrient status, healthy blood sugar and lipid metabolism, normal weight, exercise, etc.) and negative (micronutrient deficiencies, inflammation, cellular stress, a sedentary lifestyle, etc.).

Telomeres over time

Shammas M. Telomeres, lifestyle, cancer, and aging.  Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2011 Jan; 14(1): 28–34. Illustration: Ivel DrFreitas MD, ABIM, ABAARM.

How is micronutrient status linked to the aging process?

Micronutrient status has direct implications for telomere length. This makes it especially important to correct specific deficiencies and maintain micronutrient balance. Measuring total antioxidant capacity via SPECTROX® is equally important as the body’s ability to handle oxidative stress contributes significantly to telomere health/length.

Why measure fatty acids?

OmegaCheck® measures the amount of three very important fatty acids (EPA, DHA, and DPA) in one’s blood. Fatty acids can either contribute to or alleviate inflammation, and the OmegaCheck determines the amount of these pro- and anti-inflammatory fatty acids. Although the protective omega-3 fatty acids influence enzyme and hormone systems throughout the body, they have gained attention primarily for their superb cardiovascular benefits. Since fatty acid status is a surrogate marker for inflammation and oxidative stress, it is not surprising that omega-3 fatty acids can slow cellular aging by preserving telomeres. When it comes to OmegaCheck, higher is better.

Omega-3 fatty acids can slow the aging process. There are many reasons for this: they reduce inflammation, help maintain the cardiovascular system healthy, and protect the brain. However, the existing research points to an entirely different mechanism of action against aging: protection of telomeres.

A recent study on people with active heart disease demonstrated that individuals with high blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids also had the lowest rate of telomere attrition, suggesting that omega-3 fatty acids protect against cellular aging.1 In another study, the adoption of comprehensive lifestyle changes (including daily supplementation with 3 grams of fish oil, which is high in omega-3 fatty acids) was associated with an increase in telomere length in human leukocytes.2 In animal studies, dietary enrichment of omega-3 fatty acids prolongs life span by approximately one-third.3

Yet another way that omega-3 fatty acids have a protective effect on telomeres is through their action on cortisol. Following six weeks of fish oil supplementation, a group of men and women in a study demonstrated significantly reduced4 cortisol, a stress hormone known to reduce the activity of telomerase,5 an enzyme that protects and even lengthens telomeres. Even stress-related cellular aging may be thwarted by omega-3 fatty acids!

SpectraCell's Telomere Analysis

SpectraCell’s telomere test measures a person’s telomere length. A control gene is also measured and compared to the telomere length, and then results are stated as a ratio. A higher ratio means a longer telomere, and younger biological age. The Telomere Score is also compared to other individuals in the same chronological age group.

The price of the Telomere Test is affordable and is also covered by insurance. Testing once each year or every other year is suggested to monitor the rate of telomere loss.

The great news is that with the telomere analysis and appropriate lifestyle, habits, you can protect your telomeres and reduce the rate at which they shorten! Discover your estimated cellular age today with a comprehensive, and individualized approach to managing the aging process. 

GET TESTED

1Ramin Farzaneh-Far et al.Association of Marine Omega-3 Fatty Acid Levels With Telomeric Aging in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease. JAMA 2010;303:250-257.

2Ornish D, Lin J, Daubenmier J et al. Increased telomerase activity and comprehensive lifestyle changes: a pilot study. Lancet Oncol 2008;9:1048-1057.

3Jolly CA, Muthukumar A, Avula CP, Troyer D, Fernandes G. Life span is prolonged in food-restricted autoimmune-prone (NZB x NZW)F(1) mice fed a diet enriched with (n-3) fatty acids. J Nutr 2001;131:2753-2760.

4Noreen EE, Sass MJ, Crowe ML, Pabon VA, Brandauer J, Averill LK. Effects of supplemental fish oil on resting metabolic rate, body composition, and salivary cortisol in healthy adults. J Int Soc Sport Nutr 2010;7:31.

5Choi J, Fauce SR, Effros RB. Reduced telomerase activity in human T lymphocytes exposed to cortisol. Brain Behav Immun 2008;22:600-605.

Topics: Telomere Homeostatis, Telomere testing, telomerase, Age Management, Cellular Age, Micronutrients and Telomere Length, OmegaCheck

Vitamin D Linked to Longer Telomeres, Suggests Study

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, May 31, 2017 @ 01:59 PM


Telomere.pngTelomeres – the protective DNA caps on every chromosome which shorten over time as a cell ages – have been correlated with chronic diseases in hundreds of studies.  A shorter telomere equates to an aging cell, and the cumulative effect of this may manifest as the degenerative diseases commonly associated with aging, including heart disease, cancer and dementia.  Low vitamin D has also been linked to several chronic diseases.  In this study, researchers sought to link the two – low vitamin D and shorter telomeres.  Telomere length was measured via PCR (polymerase chain reaction) on 4260 American adults ranging in age from 20 years old to over 60.  In the age group of 40-59 years, blood levels of vitamin D were correlated to telomere length.  In other words, higher vitamin D = longer telomeres. 

In a different study on participants from the same government-sponsored  survey (NHANES, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey), 4347 American adults were evaluated for vitamin D levels and telomere length.  After adjusting for common demographic factors (age, race, education), higher vitamin D was linked to longer telomeres.  However, after adjusting for common physical factors (smoking, BMI, activity levels), no correlation was seen.  This suggests that vitamin D may very well be correlated with telomere length, but other factors play such a big role in healthy aging (such as not smoking or getting regular exercise) that these factors make the vitamin D-telomere connection less clear.

Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Has a Modest Positive Association with Leukocyte Telomere Length in Middle-Aged US Adults. Link to ABSTRACT.

The association of telomere length and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in US adults: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Link to ABSTRACT. Link to FREE FULL TEXT. 



 

Topics: Vitamin D, telomere length, DNA, Anti-Aging, Age Management, Longer Telomeres, Degenerative Diseases