SpectraCell Blog

Micronutrients Can Help!

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, May 22, 2013 @ 02:19 PM

Topics discussed in this issue...                                            

  • Research suggests nutrient depletions from commonly prescribed drugs are actually the cause of many side effects
  • Study sheds light on how oleic acid improves immunity
  • Serine for arthritis?
  • CoQ10 shows potential as an anti-depressant
  • When it comes to colorectal cancer risk, cysteine = good, homocysteine = bad

Research suggests nutrient depletions fromprescribed drugs commonly prescribed drugs are actually the cause of many side effects - A recently published review details the enzymatic pathways that various drugs interrupt and how certain drugs deplete very specific nutrients. Nutrient depletions are implicated as a cause of common side effects and even non-compliance. 

 

oleic acidStudy sheds light on how oleic acid improves immunity - By affecting compounds released during an immune response, oleic acid quells inflammation and improves overall immunity. Specifically, oleic acid, abundant in olive oil, inhibits the production of several pro-inflammatory substances, such as Interleukin 2 (IL-2), natural killer cells (NK), interferon-gamma (INF-γ) and vascular cell adhesion molecules (VCAM). Oleic acid also reduces the amount of arachidonic acid (AA) present in cells, which in turn minimizes pro-inflammatory cytokine production.


arthritisSerine for arthritis? - Human cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients were exposed to phosphatidylserine and then evaluated for levels of inflammation.  The phosphatidylserine significantly lowered inflammation levels in vitro.  The same researchers tested phosphatidylserine’s effect on arthritic pain in an animal model and found that phosphatidylserine, which has well-established roles in neurotransmitter function, also decreased arthritic and pain symptoms.

 

CoQ10

CoQ10 shows potential as an anti-depressant - Four different doses of CoQ10 were administered for three weeks in an animal study on depression caused by chronic stress.  Depressive behaviors evaluated as were physiological markers of oxidative stress in the brain. Depressive symptoms were decreased and there was a dose-dependent reduction in damaging chemicals in the brain that are linked with depression. The authors concluded “CoQ10 may have a potential therapeutic value for the management of depressive disorders.”


cysteineWhen it comes to colorectal cancer risk, cysteine = good, homocysteine = bad. - In this clinical trial, levels of the toxic amino acid homocysteine and levels of the beneficial antioxidant cysteine were measured in over 900 women with colorectal cancer and compared to a similar group of over 900 women without cancer.   Those with the highest homocysteine (over 9.85 μmol/L) were 1.5 times more likely to have colorectal cancer than those with the lowest levels (>6.74 μmol/L).  Conversely, women with the highest levels of cysteine in the blood had a much lower risk of colorectal cancer than those with the lowest levels of cysteine.

 
For the complete article with journal abstracts,
full text and flyers click here

Topics: SpectraCell, serine, micronutrients, micronutrient testing, Homocysteine, Coenzyme Q10, Oleic Acid, Arthritis, Alpha-Lipoic Acid, Asparagine, Cysteine, Antidepressants, Cancer, Autoimmunity, cancer cells, autoimmune diseases

Are Nutrient Deficiencies Stunting your Health?

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Tue, Nov 20, 2012 @ 10:27 AM

Written by Dr. David J. Blyweiss, Sanctuary Medical Center

 

Micronutrient Testing Can Help.                                                                                  David J. Blyweiss, MD               

Are you struggling with the challenges of a chronic degenerative illness like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, inflammatory arthritis or some other chronic health issue? With overwhelming evidence that nutrient deficiencies suppress normal biochemical/biological reactions in humans including immune system function, it is important for you to understand the scope of what this means to you personally and to your family. We have become nutritionally incomplete at a time of increasing change in our environment. And it is becoming increasingly more difficult to stay healthy in the face of fighting off the stressors, toxins, allergens, infections and the chronic inflammatory/immune system failures I see everyday; in patients from 9 years old to 90.

Dr. Charles Northren MD's work; "The Criticial Significance of Colloidal Minerals" was used as evidence (and was in fact U.S. Senate Document 264), in trying to force Big Agribusiness to put back into the ground that which their plants were taking out, leaving us undermineralised and under nourished. Nothing happened - that was 1936.

It's very easy to blame caffeine containing food and drink for the generations' old osteoporotic epidemic; after all, you lose calcium with every coke or cup of coffee you drink, right? Well we lost it too forty or fifty years before, but we had silicon and strontium and magnesium and calcium amongst other nutrients our very bones needed, in the top soil. These were being absorbed by the plants we were eating and incorporating them into our bodies. Now with unbridled erosion and empty hollow ground we are bereft of these freely given gifts of health.

How do you know which vitamins, minerals or antioxidants you are missing that your grandparents or great grandparents took for granted was in their food? One of the ways is to functionally test your blood to see which micronutrients your cells are actively needing to grow.

The test I prefer is the MNT (Micronutrient Test) from Spectracell, Inc. It doesn't just take a snapshot of what's circulating in your blood at the time of the blood draw, and it doesn't infer results from metabolic waste products. It reflects what your cells need right now to function optimally. I've done the test myself and on the ones I love. It's made a difference.

After your results come in we develop a personalized program that helps supplement your deficiencies.

Dr. David J. Blyweiss is a pioneer in functional medicine, which uses the systems biology approach to manage and alleviate symptoms related to difficult-to-treat diseases by focusing on the underlying causes of the malady, and allowing the body to heal itself. He has been practicing medicine for nearly 30 years. To learn more about the Sanctuary Medical Center, please click here. For more information on about all that SpectraCell has to offer, click here.

Topics: SpectraCell, micronutrient testing, Arthritis, Antioxidants, wellness, diabetes, immune system, Vitamins, Calcium, deficiencies, Minerals, degenerative illness, cardiovascular disease, caffeine, David J. Blyweiss, MD, Dr. Charles Northren, Sanctuary Medical Center

Nutritional Considerations of Pain Management

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Fri, Nov 12, 2010 @ 04:01 PM

Chronic PainVitamin D & Musculoskeletal Pain

Vitamin D deficiency often presents clinically as musculoskeletal pain. Correcting this deficiency can improve bone and muscle pain dramatically in patients with fibromyalgia and the painful bone disease osteomalacia.

Coenzyme Q10 & Migraines, Myopathy

Supplementation with CoQ10 helps prevent migraine headaches, according to recent clinical trials. In addition, CoQ10 has been shown to relieve statin-induced myopathy by improving energy metabolism in muscle.

Carnitine & Myalgia, Neuropathy

This important amino acid facilitates the transport of fatty acids into cell mitochondria so they can be effectively used for energy. Studies suggest that a deficiency of carnitine manifests clinically as myalgia, muscle weakness or neuropathy. In fact, supplementation with carnitine has been shown to improve pain associated with chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, diabetic neuropathy, HIV-induced neuropathy, chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia.

Oleic Acid & Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

A recent study showed significant correlations between the severity of chronic fatigue syndrome and levels of oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid used by the body in energy storage.

Magnesium & Post Operative Pain

Magnesium alters pain processing by blocking NMDA receptors in the spinal cord. In several recent studies, administration of magnesium reduced consumption of pain killers post-operatively. The analgesic effect has been seen in cardiac, orthopedic, thoracic and gynecological surgery. Low magnesium levels also contribute to headaches and correlate strongly with the frequency of chest pain. Its antinociceptive effect is promising.

Choline & Acute Pain

The activation of specific receptors by choline reduces acute inflammatory pain in mice, suggesting that administration of choline may help reduce the use of medication for inflammatory pain.

Alpha Lipoic Acid & Diabetic Neuropathy

Several clinical trials have documented the beneficial use of alpha-lipoic acid in the treatment of pain from diabetic polyneuropathy.

B Vitamins & Neuropathic Pain

A recent study suggests clinical usefulness of vitamins B1, B6 and B12 in the treatment of neuropathic painful conditions following injury or inflammation. Vitamin B1 deficiency has been implicated in myopathy as well. Thiamin (vitamin B1) supplementation can also ease pain from shingles, migraine headaches and arthritis. Similarly, clinical indicators of pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis are inversely correlated with B6 levels. Riboflavin (vitamin B2) has also shown promise in reducing pain associated with inflammatory conditions and acts as a powerful agent in preventing migraine headaches. Since the B-complex vitamins work together, it is crucial to assess the functional status of each one.

Folic Acid & Migraines

A recent study showed that migraine headaches in children were significantly reduced when supplemented with folic acid. Magnesium supplementation has similar beneficial effects on the pain of pediatric migraine attacks.

Copper & Arthritis

Copper is necessary for the production of super oxide dismutase, which is a powerful anti-inflammatory enzyme. When administered to patients with rheumatoid arthritis, copper is effective in reducing inflammatory pain. Copper supplementation has also relieved patients of leg pain associated with sciatic neuritis.

Antioxidants & Inflammatory Pain

The link between oxidative stress and inflammation has been well established. A patient in an inflammatory state will likely experience more pain. Studies have shown that reactive oxygen species are produced during persistent pain, indicating an increased need for antioxidants. Specifically, cysteine may have an inhibitory role in inflammatory pain due to its potent antioxidant effects on tissues. Similar results have been demonstrated with other antioxidants such as selenium, vitamin e, vitamin c, glutathione and coenzyme Q10. Recent studies show that intracellular inflammatory response in white blood cells play an important role in the pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome. Combined antioxidant therapy also reduces pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis and fibromyalgia. Since many antioxidants work synergistically, measure a single antioxidant may not provide an accurate picture of total antioxidant function in patients experiencing either chronic or acute pain.


Topics: micronutrient testing, Coenzyme Q10, Oleic Acid, Arthritis, Vitamin D, Carnitine, Magnesium, Choline, B Vitamins, Folic Acid, Copper, Antioxidants, Pain, Migraines, Fatigue, Myopathy, Fibromyalgia