SpectraCell Blog

Fasting-Mimicking Diet Helps You Eat Your (Own) Heart Out - Reducing Cardiovascular Disease

Posted by Kirstin Keilty, MS, CNS on Fri, Feb 09, 2018 @ 11:00 AM

FMD-1.jpgAs we stroll into heart month (Feb), still the #1 killer of Americans - 20 years after the declaration to reduce heart-related deaths - here we are. Still. Trying like heck to reduce the risk of heart-related (and other co-morbidities) incidences.

According to statistics from the CDC in 2016, 610,000 heart-related deaths occur each year and it is the leading cause of death in both men and women. That is 1 in 4 Americans.

Why are we still here? After all, we know what we can do: exercise more, take our multivitamin, get regular checks-ups at our doctors' office and - oh yeah - eat more healthfully. Many of us are still sticking to our New Year's Resolutions!

Amid our plight to prepare more healthy home-cooked meals with an eye to consuming higher amounts of plant-based foods, with greater amounts of heart-protecting fiber, healthy, lean proteins, less sugar and processed foods, are we able to keep on with these habits - forever?

Some might say a resounding, "YES!", well, others...maybe...not so much. We have the statistics to prove it.

What do we do if we feel like we have "tried it all", and the results don't appear to be paying off?

What if we have test results, like an advanced lipoprotein or cardiometabolic profile that continue to stare us in the face and prove the errors of our ways? It's disheartening when the labors of our actions appear to be largely ignored by our body's metabolism.

Is it time to finally give up? Should New Year's Resolutions focus on some other aspect, other than finally getting healthy?

Perhaps it is time for a different approach…

The practice of fasting has had many surges over the millennia, extending from times of scarcity, to practices of mystics and religious groups and holidays to health-faddists. Some believed it brought spiritual enlightenment, or quick weight loss; while others believed it gave the digestive system a chance to rejuvenate itself, similar to the idea that adequate nightly sleep allows a reset of the nervous system.

It is largely this last assumption which has pioneered continued research into fasting and its multiple health benefits, including heart (but not limited to) health.1-4

I had the good fortune of learning first-hand about the incredible research into fasting this past December while attending the American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine in Las Vegas. Valter Longo, PhD, who directs the USC Longevity Institute, expertly presented his research on fasting and its connection to a longer, healthier existence.5 Instead of fasting for long periods of time (4 days to a couple of weeks), the same benefits can be achieved through "Time-Restricted Fasting/Re-feeding" (TRF) or "Fasting-Mimicking Diet" (FMD). Below are two links to fascinating presentations featuring Dr. Longo and his work.

BBC Documentary with Longo and Maslow

FoundMyFitness Interview Longo and Rhonda Patrick

Essentially, with TRF and FMD, an individual can positively impact health for prolonged periods of time simply by choosing to consume all of their daily calories in an 8-hour window. If the first caloric consumption (this includes beverages so no cream or sugar in your coffee) of the day starts at 10:00 AM, an individual is done feeding by 6:00 that evening. If 11:00 is start time, 7:00 is finish time, and so forth.

What does FMD do, exactly?

The Fasting-Mimicking Diet creates the time needed to accomplish an "internal housekeeping" on the cellular level known to stimulate a pathway called: autophagy. Whether you choose to say it "Ah-tauf-ah-gee"or "auto-fay-gee" (I've learned both are right), somatic cells auto-phagocytize, literally eat themselves, to sweep out the debris of aberrant (faulty, damaged or maladapted) cells that build up in our cellular metabolism. Additionally, internal organs, like the heart, all shrink to their reset size, which allows for more effective functioning. When we eat too frequently and don't allow the digestive system to rest, clean and rebuild with re-feeding, autophagy processes are disrupted.

How will autophagy improve my heart health, specifically?

As noted earlier, autophagy has profound positive effects on many body systems and functions, as well as cancer prevention and other diseases, but one of the most researched areas in autophagy include cardiovascular disease. Since mitochondria are found in abundance within the cardiac muscle and TRF and FMD precipitate autophagy, another way fasting improves heart health might be through preserving mitochondrial integrity.
6

Dr. Longo's research has also shown that TRF and FMD influences cellular adaptive responses by reducing oxidative damage and inflammation; as well as optimizing energy metabolism and bolstering cellular protection.7

  1. Xie W, Zhou J. Aberrant regulation of autophagy in mammalian diseases. Biol Lett. 2018;14(1).
  2. O'Flanagan CH, Smith LA, McDonell SB, Hursting SD. When less may be more: calorie restriction and response to cancer therapy. BMC Med. 2017;15(1):106.
  3. Choi IY, Piccio L, Childress P, et al. A Diet Mimicking Fasting Promotes Regeneration and Reduces Autoimmunity and Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms. Cell Rep. 2016;15(10):2136-2146.
  4. Brandhorst S, Choi IY, Wei M, et al. A Periodic Diet that Mimics Fasting Promotes Multi-System Regeneration, Enhanced Cognitive Performance, and Healthspan. Cell Metab. 2015;22(1):86-99.
  5. Longo VD, Panda S. Fasting, Circadian Rhythms, and Time-Restricted Feeding in Healthy Lifespan. Cell Metab. 2016;23(6):1048-1059.
  6. Traba J, Sack MN. The role of caloric load and mitochondrial homeostasis in the regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Cell Mol Life Sci. 2017;74(10):1777-1791.
  7. Longo VD, Mattson MP. Fasting: molecular mechanisms and clinical applications. Cell Metab. 2014;19(2):181-192.

Topics: Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Heart Health, Fasting-Mimicking Diet, FMD, FMD Helps Reduce Cardiovascular Disease, Autophagy, Cellular Metabolism

CoQ10

Posted by Elissa Rodriguez on Wed, Oct 05, 2016 @ 03:58 PM

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Why you should know about CoQ10 if you are taking a statin.

Most Americans have heard of statins, a group of drugs commonly prescribed to lower cholesterol levels.  But many people are not familiar with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), the micronutrient that is known to be depleted by most people who take statins. In fact, the original patent for statins (AKA “HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors”) acknowledged this as early as 1990; however, this is still not widely known today. CoQ10 (AKA ubiquinone because it is so ubiquitous in the body) is a substance that creates energy, the most fundamental of all cell functions. Tissues with a high energy requirement – heart, liver and muscles – require CoQ10 to work.  If these cells don’t have sufficient CoQ10, a person may eventually experience fatigue, muscular pains, or both. 

Do you know your CoQ10 status? Get your SpectraCell Micronutrient Test today!

GET TESTED 

Topics: micronutrients, Coenzyme Q10, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Nutrition, Heart Health, cardiovascular disease, statin, chronic, CoQ10, disease

Do the Prescriptions YOU take deplete your nutritional status?

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, Jul 24, 2013 @ 03:34 PM

When a person takes prescription drugs or over the counter medication chances are that they can prescription depletions Page 1 resized 600 be affecting their nutrient levels. Below are some of the possible deficiencies that are correlated with each corresponding drug.

Antacids/Ulcer medications

  • vitamin B12 - Anemia, depression, tiredness, weakness, increased cardiovascular risk

  • Folic Acid - Birth defects, cervical dysplasia, anemia, heart disease, cancer risk

  • vitamin D - osteoporosis, muscle weakness, hearing loss

  • Calcium - Osteoporosis, heart and blood pressure irregularities, tooth decay

  • Iron - Anemia, weakness, fatigue, hair loss, brittle nails

  • Zinc - weak immunity, wound healing, sense of smell/taste, sexual dysfunction


Antibiotics

  • B vitamins, Vitamin K - short term depletion affects are minimal, but failure to re-inoculate the GI tract with beneficial bacteria (probiotics) often results in dysbiosis which causes gas, bloating, decreases digestion & absorption of nutrients, and also may lead to a variety of other health problems.

  • Calcium - osteoporosis, heart & blood pressure irregularities, tooth decay

  • magnesium - cardiovascular problems, asthma, osteoporosis, cramps, PMS

  • Iron - slow wound healing, fatigue, anemia

  • vitamin B6 - depression, sleep disturbance, increased cardiovascular disease risk

  • zinc - weak immunity, wound healing, sense of smell/taste, sexual dysfunction


Cholesterol drugs

  • Coenzyme Q10 - Various cardiovascular problems, weak immune system, low energy


Female Hormones

  • Vitamin B6 - depression, sleep disturbance, increased cardiovascular disease risk

  • Folic acid - birth defects, cervical dysplasia, anemia, cardiovascular disease

  • vitamin B1 - depression, irritability, memory loss, muscle weakness, edema

  • vitamin B2 - problems with skin, eyes, mucous membranes and nerves

  • vitamin B6 - depression, sleep disturbances, increased cardiovascular disease risk

  • vitamin B12 - anemia, depression, tiredness, weakness, increased cardiovascular risk

  • vitamin C - lowered immune system, easy bruising, poor wound healing

  • magnesium - cardiovascular problems, asthma, osteoporosis, cramps, PMS

  • selenium - lower immunity, reduced antioxidant protection'

  • zinc - weak immunity, wound healing, sense of smell/taste, sexual dysfunction


Anti-Inflammatories

  • calcium - osteoporosis, heart and blood pressure irregularities, tooth decay

  • vitamin D - osteoporosis, muscle weakness, hearing loss

  • magnesium - cardiovascular problems, asthma, osteoporosis, cramps, PMS

  • zinc - weak immunity, wound healing, sense of smell/taste, sexual dysfunction

  • vitamin C - lowered immunity, easy bruising, poor wound healing

  • vitamin B6 - depression, sleep disturbances,increased cardiovascular disease risk

  • vitamin B12 - anemia, depressioon, tiredness, weakness, increased cardiovascular risk

  • Folic Acid - birth defects, cervical dysplasia, anemia, cardiovascular disease

  • Selenium - lower immunity, reduced antioxidant protection

  • chromium - elevated blood sugar, cholesterol & triglycerides, diabetes risk

  • vitamin B5 - fatigue, listlessness, and possible problems with skin, liver and nerves

For a complete list of drugs and their correlating deficiencies click here

If you would like to check your nutrient levels click here

Topics: SpectraCell, micronutrients, Coenzyme Q10, Antidepressants, Cancer, autoimmune diseases, zinc, Vitamin D, Carnitine, Magnesium, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin B6, B Vitamins, Folic Acid, Antioxidants, Fibromyalgia, Cholesterol, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Vitamin K, Vitamin B12, Chronic Disease, diabetes, immune system, E-zinc, Vitamins, Calcium, Fertility, PMS, deficiencies, chronic fatigue and nutrition, health, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Depression, Diet, Digestion, Stress, Vitamin B1, micronutrient test, Inflammation, Vitamin B5, High Blood Pressure, Vitamin B2, Iron, Nutritional Deficiency, Cancer Prevention, Heart Health, Gastrointestinal Tract, Hypothyroidism, Allergies, Wound Healing, Vitamin B3, Antihistamines, cardiovascular disease, Nutrient, hypertension, Women's Health

Why Test YOUR Micronutrient Levels & MTHFR?

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, Jul 10, 2013 @ 01:49 PM

New Grid 2013


Why is an MTHFR test important?

Determining your MTHFR genotype gives you valuable information about your body's ability to methylate.  Methylation is a crucial part of cell processes and reduced function has been linked to numerous medical conditions including neurological and cardiovascular disorders, mental dysfunctions and diabetes.  The old paradigm that we are simply at the mercy of our genes is now challenged by a new age of truly individualized healthcare.  Get vital knowledge for your personalized healthcare solutions today.

What role does nutrition play in this function?

Nutrition plays a substantial role in methylation pathways, and SpectraCell's Micronutrient testing can give you an accurate stats of 33 vitamins, minerals and amino acids.  You may be able to compensate for your body's inability to methylate efficiently through targeted repletion, and micronutrient testing will provide assessment of nutritional deficiencies.  The test also allows you to identify deficiencies in other micronutrients that can be contributing toward the development and/or progression of chronic disease and keep you from feeling your best.

SpectraCell Laboratories is combining the Micronutrient Testing and MTHFR Genotyping as a special package promotion.  To find out more CLICK HERE!

Topics: SpectraCell, micronutrients, micronutrient testing, Autoimmunity, cancer cells, autoimmune diseases, telomere length, Telomere testing, telomerase, B Vitamins, Antioxidants, Cardiovascular Health, MTHFR Genotyping, Genotyping, Heart Disease, vitamin, nutrition testing, supplements, Chronic Disease, diabetes, immune system, expecting mothers, early pregnancy, E-zinc, breast cancer, telomere, Elderly, Dr. Ron Grabowski, Minerals, micronutrient test, Nutritional Deficiency, Cancer Prevention, Heart Health, Gastrointestinal Tract, Hormones, telomere and cancer, Spectrox, Energy, Methylation, Estrogen, Immunidex, eczema and nutrition, Alzheimers, Free Radicals, Genetics, Dr. Eva Cwynar, Women's Health

Clinical Applications of MTHFR Genomic Testing

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Tue, Jan 22, 2013 @ 03:50 PM

Clinical Applications of MTHFR Genomic Testing webinar presented by Dr. Bridget Briggs
 
What you learned:  Dr. Briggs, MTHFR
  • Methylation processes in the body. 
  • The function of MTHFR and the common polymorphisms found in 40% of Americans
  • The links between the common polymorphisms in MTHFR and risks involving cardiovascular disease, thromboembolic disease, irritable bowel, depression, memory agility, autoimmunity, poor detoxification, infertility, PMS, insomnia and many other disorders. 
  • Treatment for patients with common polymorphisms including L-5 MTHF, Methylcobalamin, B6, Trimethylglycine, inositol, and other key nutrients.

  • Case Study Review

Clinical Applications of MTHFR Genomic Testing Webinar

 

Topics: SpectraCell, Autoimmunity, cancer cells, autoimmune diseases, Telomere testing, B Vitamins, Fibromyalgia, ApoE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Health, diagnostic tools, MTHFR Genotyping, Genotyping, Multivitamins, Chronic Disease, immune system, breast cancer, deficiencies, Elderly, chronic fatigue and nutrition, health, Case Study, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, degenerative illness, Cancer Prevention, Heart Health, Gastrointestinal Tract, cardiovascular disease, Energy, Methylation, Immunidex, Immunity, eczema and nutrition, Genetics, Bowel Disease, Controversy, Dr. Bridget Briggs, Women's Health

Homocysteine is About More than Just Cardiovascular Risk

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Tue, Jun 14, 2011 @ 11:48 AM

Guest Blog by Arland Hill, DC, MPH, DACBN

 Homocysteine LevelsHomocysteine came to light in the research on the back of cardiovascular disease. Well respected clinician and researcher Kilmer McCully, MD noted the correlation between cardiovascular disease initiation and development and elevated homocysteine levels. Since this discovery, homocysteine research has uncovered additional areas whereby elevations in homocysteine may be a risk factor for damage.

Homocysteine, an amino acid with several health implications, is a measure of a process known as methylation. Methylation, which is the donation of a methyl or single carbon group, has multiple roles in the body. Some of these include hepatic detoxification, DNA and RNA replication and neurological function. The idea that homocysteine as a measure of cardiovascular is its most useful role short-changes the multitude of other areas where homocysteine has clinical significance.

NeurologyHomocysteine has received recent attention in the area of neurology. Various forms of dementia and neurodegeneration have been linked to homocysteine. Moreover, none of the elucidated pathways have to do with cardiovascular disease or inhibited blood supply to the brain. The two most classical neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease both have links to homocysteine. Alzheimer’s, which is characterized by amyloid and tau protein formation, results in degeneration of the hippocampal region of the brain, where short term memory is formulated and processed into long term memory. Though not completely related to homocysteine accumulation, it does appear that formation of these proteins is in part related to homocysteine. Likewise, elevations in homocysteine are also associated with Parkinson’s and degeneration of the dopamine producing areas and pathways. Worst yet though is that the common treatment for Parkinson’s, levadopa, increases homocysteine levels, making the need for homocysteine lowering therapy even more critical. It can be stated that excess levels of homocysteine increase the risk of whole brain atrophy. However, the impact of homocysteine hardly stops here.

Homocysteine is known to damage soft tissues, but what about the hard tissues of the body such as bone. Elevations alter the structural aspect of the bone making it less dense and ultimately weaker setting the stage for osteoporosis.

Blood CellsThe red and white blood cells are not protected from the effects of homocysteine either. Homocysteine has been shown to directly promote blood clotting through induction of thrombin, a promoter of platelet aggregation. Neutrophils, the first line defense against bacteria and foreign substances, when active present receptors that are sensitive to homocysteine. This promotes additional stimulation of other immune system cells resulting in a heightened response that can be overactive.

Homocysteine can also directly impact how you feel and look. Insulin resistance, a state commonly assessed by higher insulin levels, is tied to homocysteine. Homocysteine elevations impair the ability of the liver to store excess glucose, thus forcing it to stay in the blood stream. This ultimately makes the insulin resistance presentation worse, and since the cells do not get the energy they need, fatigue sets in. To add insult to injury, homocysteine damages both your external skin that the world sees, and also your internal organs. In a nutshell, this can be viewed as universal aging.

If you want to look your best, feel your best, and have an overall state of general wellness, homocysteine levels should be viewed routinely.

Dr. Arland Hill

Arland Hill, DC, MPH, DACBN - Complete Care Chiropractic and Wellness 

For more information about Dr. Hill, please visit his website or his blog. Or, contact him at 281-557-7200.

Topics: Homocysteine, Cardiovascular Health, wellness, Neurology, Aging, Osteoporosis, Insulin Resistance, Methylation, Alzheimers, Amino Acid, Parkinsons disease

The Relevance of LDL Phenotype

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Fri, Jun 03, 2011 @ 10:16 AM

LPP LogoThe LDL phenotype and size result has been removed from our most recent LPP™ report due to misinterpretation and lack of therapeutic guidance.

LDL phenotype is an outdated designation to identify a large LDL type from a small LDL type. LDL phenotype was used in the past because accurate data on individual LDL subgroups was not available or inaccurate. Today the LPP™ test gives accurate information on large-buoyant and small-dense LDL subgroups and this is much more specific for treatment and risk assessment than phenotype.

LPP Sample ReportPhenotype is one result that represents an average density or size for all LDL subgroups and is useful if the value of LDL is high but is very misleading if LDL is low. In fact when LDL is low or reduced in treatment the end result is often a more smalldense LDL profile with a type B phenotype. Therapy such as statin drugs remove mostly large-buoyant LDL leaving the treated patient with a much reduced LDL particle number that is comprised of a higher percentage of small-dense LDL. Since overall particle numbers are reduced this is a positive result for the patient.

A better method for LDL risk assessment and treatment is to use the number of LDL III and IV particles as a guide. These values give the exact number of type B or the most atherogenic LDL particles regardless of the phenotype designation.

The qualitative phenotype result can be determined in an alternate way rather than from the mean LDL density by looking at the dense LDL III and LDL IV subgroups. If both LDL III and LDL IV are “normal” then the phenotype is “Type A”. If one or both LDL III or LDL IV is “borderline” then the phenotype is “Type I” and if one or both LDL III or LDL IV is “high” then the phenotype is “Type B”.

 

Topics: SpectraCell, lipoprotein particle profile, LPP, Cardiovascular Health, LDL, Risk Assessment

SpectraCell Now Offers LPP™ Cardiovascular Testing in New York

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Tue, May 17, 2011 @ 12:56 PM

Lipoprotein Particle Profile TestingSpectraCell Laboratories has officially been granted a license to provide its Lipoprotein Particle Profile™ (LPP™) test, which assesses cardiovascular risk, to New York state physicians and patients. The recently patented LPP™ test has been commercially available to the other 49 states since 2006.

SpectraCell began the process of acquiring a licensure in 2008 with an application submission the state of New York. The laboratory underwent an initial inspection by the New York State Department of Health in late 2009 followed by extensive documentation validating the LPP™ procedure, which is standard protocol required of all diagnostic laboratories. A final inspection in December 2010 concluded the evidentiary process, proving the LPP™ technology is valid, accurate and reproducible.

“Acquiring our New York license allows us to serve the largest metropolitan area in the country,” states Dr. Fred Crawford, PhD, VP of Operations and Laboratory Director at SpectraCell Labs. “In fact, many physicians in the state of New York have wanted to implement the LPP™ test in their practice but were unable to do so until now. Plus, we recently streamlined our LPP™ report using feedback from existing LPP™ clients, making it easier than ever for physicians to translate LPP™ results into clinical decisions.”

New York represents a large market for laboratory testing. According to a CNN report, approximately 40,000 physicians practice within a 30 mile radius of New York City, in contrast to a national average of about 8000 physicians for other American cities.

LPP TestingAfter visiting the laboratory and reviewing the testing protocol, Dr. Robert Rej, Director of Chemistry for the State of New York Department of Health recommended the permit be approved for SpectraCell’s LPP™ testing. The license also allows SpectraCell to add FDA approved chemistry procedures to New York clients. Their first addition will be LpPLA2 testing (lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2) which measures a specific enzyme linked to thrombosis (blood clots), indicating a higher risk of heart attack or stroke.

Just a few months ago, SpectraCell Laboratories was awarded a patent on their Lipoprotein Particle Profile™ (LPP™) test, which measures both the size and number of lipoproteins rather than the cholesterol contained within them. In recent years, more doctors have seen standard cholesterol tests label a patient “normal” when in reality their risk for heart disease is quite high.

Measuring Cholesterol is Not EnoughIn fact, The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) acknowledges that 50% of people that have heart attacks have “normal” cholesterol – that is, cholesterol below 200 mg/dL. The LPP™ test allows physicians to stratify risk more accurately, thus prescribing therapies that will be the most effective, depending on their patients’specific lipid profile.

NCEP recognizes four risk factors that are not measured with routine cholesterol testing but are all measured by the LPP™ test:

  1. RLP – (remnant lipoprotein) more easily converted into arterial plaque than other lipoproteins
  2. Lp(a) – a dangerous lipoprotein that contributes to clot formation
  3. HDL2b – a type of HDL that indicates how well cholesterol is being cleared from your system
  4. Small, dense LDL – easily penetrates vascular wall, causing damage and plaque

The LPP™ is part of the trend toward more individualized medicine. The LPP™ test, which is done on a fasting blood sample, is usually covered by insurance. Results typically take 3-5 days.

Stop by our booths in New York City!

We will be at Booth #28 at the National Lipid Association (NLA) Scientific Session (May 19-22, 2011) and Booth #435 at Pri-Med (June 16-18, 2011)!



 

Topics: SpectraCell, lipoprotein particle profile, LPP, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Lipoproteins, Lp(a), Heart Attack, Lipoprotein Particles, NCEP, RLP, New York State License

Why Do Omega-3 Fatty Acids Affect So Many Functions In Our Body?

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Fri, May 06, 2011 @ 03:16 PM

Omega 3 Fatty AcidsThe answer is simple: cell membrane flexibility.  Every cell has a cell membrane.  When this cell membrane is rigid, it does not work well.  When it is flexible, the chemicals that run our bodies - hormones, proteins, enzymes, vitamins, minerals, fats, etc - can move in and out of cells efficiently as needed, thus making the cells healthier, since the materials they need to function well are available.  When the cells work well, the tissues that are made of cells work well.  When tissues work well, the whole system works well and ultimately leads to overall improved health of the entire person.

For example, when there are enough omega-3 fatty acids available through either diet or supplementation, they will be absorbed into cells in the heart, making their cell membranes flexible, but strong.  Consequently, the heart and arteries are stronger and therefore the entire cardiovascular system benefits.  In fact, in the same way that omega-3 fats make cell membranes more flexible, the dangerous trans fats do the exact opposite - they are absorbed into the cell membranes making them stiff and unable to do their job.  Just as stiff joints or stiff arteries are unhealthy, so are inflexible cell membranes.  And since cell membranes are an integral part of every tissue in the body, the level of omega-3 fatty acids a person has can affect just about everything (see below).

Omega 3 Benefits Here

SpectraCell's HS-Omega-3 Index® measures the amount of two very important omega-3 fatty acids - EPA and DHA - in a person's red blood cells.

Topics: SpectraCell, HS-Omega-3 Index, Omega 3 Fatty Acid, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, health, DHA, Omega 3s, EPA, Women's Health

UPDATE: 2011 Lipoprotein Particle Profile™ (LPP™) Report Enhancements

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Thu, Mar 31, 2011 @ 01:32 PM

Cardiovascular healthWe are excited to introduce our new report for the Lipoprotein Particle Profile™. We believe the changes that have been made will make the report easier to read and will facilitate your assessment of risk and the selection of patient specific treatment programs.

Addition of the Traditional Lipid Panel (Cholesterol, Triglycerides, HDL, LDL)

Many physicians continue to utilize the traditional cholesterol or lipid panel for guidance in the selection of an appropriate treatment strategy. Although we believe that the treatment is better determined by the application of the results from HDL and LDL subgroups and their particle numbers, the traditional lipid panel continues to be used for risk assessment and we are therefore including it in our report.

Elimination of CEQ

Many physicians and their patients found the practice of reporting lipoprotein test results in terms of cholesterol equivalents confusing. Therefore, we are eliminating this concept from our report.

Addition of ApoB, non-HDL cholesterol and non-HDL particle numbers

A value for non-HDL cholesterol has been included since it is likely to be the new NCEP ATP IV target of therapy when the guidelines are released later this year. Additionally we have added Apolipoprotein B and non-HDL particle numbers which were the focus of the Consensus Statement of the American College of Cardiology and the American Diabetes Association for better risk assessment. Individual variability in the triglyceride and cholesterol composition of the lipoprotein subgroups can make particle numbers more meaningful in risk assessment.

LPP Sample Test ReportOther report changes include:

• Lp(a) results have been moved to the Risk Modification section.

• The reporting units for hs-CRP have been changed from mg/dL to mg/L which changes the reference range to 0.00 – 3.00 mg/L.

• The LDL mean size/phenotype result has been deleted as this result can often be misleading as a result of variances in the total LDL result.

• The Apo B reference range has been changed to 40 – 100 mg/dL.

• The Apo A1 reference range has been changed to 115 – 224 mg/dL. This test is not a part of the LPP™ Basic or Plus panels, it must be ordered separately.

Are you using a cardiovascular risk assessment in your practice?

Topics: lipoprotein particle profile, LPP, Cholesterol, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Lp(a), Triglycerides, LDL and HDL, Apo A, Apo B