SpectraCell Blog

Vitamins, minerals and antioxidants can help!

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Thu, Jan 10, 2013 @ 01:20 PM

Is carnitine the answer for male infertility?male, infertility
A group of men (n=96) who had been diagnosed as infertile for at least 18 months were given the following nutritional formulation daily for four months: L-carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine, fructose, citric acid, selenium, coenzyme Q10, zinc, vitamin C, vitamin B12 and folic acid (see abstract for exact dosages).  At the end of the study, sperm motility improved and 16 of the patients had achieved pregnancy.  The authors concluded that carnitine may be the key component of the supplement cocktail for improving sperm quality. (Italian Archives of Urology and Andrology, September 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Prospective open-label study on the efficacy and tolerability of a combination of nutritional supplements in primary infertile patients with idiopathic astenoteratozoospermia.

 

Vitamin D helps leg ulcers heal
In this double-blind, placebo controlled trial, 26 patients Vitamins, Vitamin Dwith leg ulcers were given either placebo or 50,000 IU vitamin D weekly for two months.  Leg ulcer size, blood levels of vitamin D and pain was measured before and after the two month trial.  In the vitamin D group, leg ulcers were reduced in size by 28% while the placebo group had only a 9% reduction in ulcer size. The authors stated “there was a trend toward better healing in those with vitamin D reposition.” (Journal of Brazilian College of Surgeons, October 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Vitamin D and skin repair: a prospective, double-blind and placebo controlled study in the healing of leg ulcers.
LINK to FREE FULL TEXT

 

Complexity of methylation reactions gains insightmethyl donor, nutrients
This review emphasizes how methyl donor nutrients such as choline, folic acid and methionine interact and how consumption (via supplement or food) of one can have sparing effect s on another – such as choline’s  sparing effect on methionine, for example. (Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care, January 2013)

LINK to ABSTRACT The nutritional burden of methylation reactions.
LINK to FLYER on NUTRIENT INTERACTIONS in METHYLATION

For more journal articles by disease or nutrient please click here

 

Topics: SpectraCell, serine, micronutrients, Coenzyme Q10, Oleic Acid, Cysteine, autoimmune diseases, zinc, Vitamin D, Carnitine, Magnesium, Choline, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Selenium, Vitamin B6, B Vitamins, Folic Acid, Antioxidants, lipoprotein particle profile, Omega 3 Fatty Acid, diagnostic tools, vitamin, wellness, pregnancy, Serum, Vitamin K, Vitamin B12, supplements, Multivitamins, Nutrition, diabetes, immune system, E-zinc, N-acetylcysteine, DNA, Calcium, Fertility, Lipoic Acid, deficiencies, health, Case Study, Omega 3s, Depression, Glutamine, Minerals, Neurotransmitters, Stress, Vitamin B1, micronutrient test, Vitamin B5, Vitamin B2, Nutritional Deficiency, Vitamin B3, cardiovascular disease, Hormones, Reproductive Health, Chromium, Manganese, Muscle recovery, Erectile Dysfunction, infertility, Niacin, Prostate, Energy, Methylation, Carbohydrate Metabolism

The Thyroid: What, Where and How

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Fri, Aug 31, 2012 @ 10:49 AM

The Fatigue SolutionExcerpt from Eva Cwynar, M.D.'s new book, "The Fatigue Solution"

The simplest way to describe your thyroid and its function is to compare it to a furnace that is run by a thermostat (the pituitary gland). Together, they regulate how much energy and stamina you have on a daily basis. The amount of thyroid hormone you have affects how well you have slept, how you feel when you get up in the morning, and how effectively you will make it through your day.

Thyroid function affects every cell in the body. It is the main regulator of basal metabolism, which is the amount of energy needed to maintain essential physiologic functions when you are at complete rest, both physically and mentally. If your thyroid gland is not producing optimally, your cells cannot properly take in the nutrients they need, receive the right amount of oxygen, or get rid of waste materials efficiently. Thyroid hormones also affect your heart, muscles, bones, and cholesterol, to name just several of its jobs.

Introducing the 3s and 4s:

There are two main hormones produced by the thyroid:

  • Triiodothyronine, known as T3
  • Tetraiodothyronine, known as T4

You many have noticed a portion of the word "iodine" in each of the hormones above. That's because the function of the thyroid gland is to take iodine, found in many foods, and convert it into thyroid hormones. Thyroid cells are the only cells in the body that can absorb iodine.

These cells combine iodine and the amino acid tyrosine to make T3 and T4. The normal thyroid gland manufactures both T3 and T4; it produces about 80 percent T4 and about 20% T3. However, T3 is about four times as potent as T4. T4 is actually a precursor to T3. While traveling through the liver, T4 loses one of its iodine molecules, which converts the T4 to T3.

There is one more factor we have to mention to complete this process, and that is Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), which is produced by the pituitary gland in the brain and gives that gland its thermostat-like function. So the thyroid is the furnace that provides the "heat" in the form of the T3 and T4 hormones and the pituitary gland is the thermostat that goes on and off according to the amount of heat in the body. TSH tells the thyroid to raise or lower the heat. The process goes like this:

T3 and T4 travel through the bloodstream, producing heat

Arrow

The pituitary gland senses the heat; the thermostat shuts off; TSH production slows down

Arrow

The body cools as the level of thyroid hormones decrease

Arrow

The pituitary senses the decrease in temperature; the thermostat pops on; TSH production increases

Arrow

The furnace produces more heat.

When  your body temperature drops, your metabolic rate drops, too. You produce less energy, and you store more calories as fat - in other words, you gain weight. You also suffer from fatigue, irritability, and the inability to concentrate.

Learn more about this topic below:

Also, to learn more about Dr. Eva Cwynar, visit her website: www.dreva.com

 

Topics: Fatigue, Thyroid, Hormones, Dr. Eva Cwynar

Why Do We Get PMS?

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Tue, Jul 31, 2012 @ 11:20 AM

The Fatigue SolutionExcerpt from Eva Cwynar, M.D.'s new book, "The Fatigue Solution"

We've come a long way since the time when doctors used to debate the reality of PMS, but the short answer is that there are many reasons why PMS occurs. There are several different theories:

  • Decline in progesterone levels. PMS symptoms occur during the luteal phase of a woman's cycle, which is when progesterone begins to rise (right after ovulation) and then starts to plummet about 7 days later. When you are about to get your period, your progesterone levels rapidly drop. That's what causes problems. Hormone levels normally fluctuate. If progesterone levels were measured on a scale of 1 to 10, for example, they could drop from a level of 10 to a 9.9 to a 9.8 to a 9.7 and your body would be able to adjust to the changing levels with almost no difficulty. When you're about to get your period, however, levels drop dramatically from a 10 to a 5 and perhaps even to a 1. It's that rapid change that stimulates your symptoms. And some women drop faster and lower than others, which is why their symptoms may be worse than other women's.
  • Decrease in neurotransmitters serotonin and GABA activity. Serotonin is responsible for our positive emotional well-being, while GABA helps keep us calm. Reduced levels of estrogen during the luteal phase may ben linked to a drop in serotonin. Lower serotonin levels are associated with irritability, anger, and carbohydrate cravings, all of which are symptoms of PMS. It also appears that GABA receptors are less sensitive than normal, which would explain the increased sense of anxiety.
  • Changes in levels of norepinephrine and epinephrine. These neurotransmitters are involved in the body's stress response. Estrogen may affect the levels of these neurotransmitters, which can influence blood pressure and heart rate as well as mood.

Other possible causes include:

  • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)
  • Mercury toxicity
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Candida overgrowth (a fungus)
  • Food allergies/sensitivities
  • Vitamin B6, Calcium or Magnesium deficiencies
  • Inadequate protein intake - liver enzymes that convert female hormones depend on protein
  • Poor liver function - the liver metabolizes one form of estrogen into other forms of estrogen
  • Poor adrenal gland function

No one knows for sure what causes PMS. Some people attribute particular symptoms to increased levels of estrogen and/or progesterone; other people say the same symptom is due to decreased levels of these hormones. Studies routinely produce conflicting results. I believe that the key to eliminating or greatly reducing PMS symptoms lies in the balance between these two hormones during the menstrual cycle.

Learn more about this topic below:

Also, to learn more about Dr. Eva Cwynar, visit her website: www.dreva.com

 

Topics: Magnesium, Vitamin B6, Fatigue, Calcium, PMS, Hormones, Dr. Eva Cwynar

SpectraCell's Clinical Updates - Volume 6, Issue 5

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Thu, May 31, 2012 @ 03:57 PM

Parkinson's DiseaseCLINICAL UPDATE - COQ10 A NEW BIOMARKER FOR PARKINSON'S DISEASE?
In this study, 22 patients with Parkinson’s Disease were compared to 88 age-matched controls that did not have Parkinson’s.  Functional levels of several antioxidants – coenzyme Q10, glutathione, selenium, vitamin E and lipoic acid – were measured using SpectraCell’s micronutrient testing.  A deficiency of CoQ10 occurred in 32% of Parkinson’s patients while only 8% of controls were deficient in coQ10.  Interestingly, this was not true for any other antioxidants, leaving authors to conclude that measuring coQ10 status could determine which Parkinson’s patients would benefit from coQ10 supplements, which has proven to slow the progression of Parkinson’s in various clinical trials. (Journal of Neurological Science, April 2012; Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, December 2011)

LINK to ABSTRACT Coenzyme Q10 deficiency in patients with Parkinson's disease.
LINK to ABSTRACT Coenzyme Q10 for Parkinson's disease.

Vitamin D and TestosteroneCLINICAL UPDATE - LOW VITAMIN D AND TESTOSTERONE IS A DEADLY COMBINATION
Testosterone and vitamin D was measured in over 2000 men. Those with a deficiency in both vitamin D and testosterone were more than twice as likely to have a fatal cardiovascular event and over 1 ½ times as likely to have a fatal event that was non- cardiovascular related. (Clinical Endocrinology, February 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Combination of low free testosterone and low vitamin D predicts mortality in older men referred for coronary angiography.

DepressionCLINICAL UPDATE - SMALL CHANGES IN OMEGA 3 INDEX = BIG CHANGES IN DEPRESSION RATES
Omega 3 index and fatty acids were measured in 150 adolescents that had been hospitalized for depression and compared to 161 controls.  For a 1% increase in the omega 3 index, teenagers were 28% less likely to have severe depression.   The omega 3 index is a measure of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoeic acid (DHA) in red blood cells, which is correlates to fatty acid content in other tissues as well. (Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, April 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Red blood cell fatty acids are associated with depression in a case-control study of adolescents.

Choline and OffspringCLINICAL UPDATE - CHOLINE STATUS OF MOM AFFECTS HORMONE LEVELS IN OFFSPRING
Pregnant women were given either 930 or 480 mg/day of choline in their third trimester.  After twelve weeks, the group with higher choline intake had babies with less cortisol in their blood, possibly to due improved methylation of DNA in the placenta, which was also measured.  The authors concluded that maternal choline intake affects genes in the offspring that regulate cortisol production. (Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, May 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Maternal choline intake alters the epigenetic state of fetal cortisol-regulating genes in humans.

Pain and ShinglesCLINICAL UPDATE - INTRAVENOUS VITAMIN C REDUCES SHINGLES PAIN
In this study, 16 practioners gave vitamin C intravenously to 67 patients with symptomatic herpes zoster pain.  The dosage was 7.5 grams per 50 mL administered for two weeks.  Pain and skin eruptions associated with the shingles (herpes zoster) virus were significantly reduced for up to 12 weeks following injections. (Medical Science Monitor, April 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Intravenous Vitamin C in the treatment of shingles: Results of a multicenter prospective cohort study.
 
Trans FatsCLINICAL UPDATE - TRANS FATS LINKED TO AGGRESSION
Dietary intake of trans fat was estimated (via dietary survey) on 945 men and women and each rated their irritability and aggressive behaviours with a standardized test.  The authors of the study concluded that ‘this study provides the first evidence linking dietary trans fatty acids with behavioural irritability and aggression.” (PLoS One, 2012)

LINK to ABSTRACT Trans fat consumption and aggression.
LINK to FREE FULL TEXT

Browse our archive of all past clinical updates from the past 6 years!



Topics: Coenzyme Q10, Vitamin D, Choline, Vitamin C, Omega 3 Fatty Acid, Depression, Aggression, Hormones, Testosterone, Shingles, Trans Fats, Parkinsons disease

Telomeres, Hormones and Aging

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Mon, Feb 27, 2012 @ 10:51 AM

Guest blog by: Dr. Mike Carragher

Telomere TestingTelomere length gives us a unique view of how your cells are aging.  Knowing this can help you decide how aggressive your anti-aging program should be.

Telomeres are sections of genetic material at the end of each chromosome whose primary function is to prevent chromosomal “fraying” when a cell replicates. Think of the plastic tip of shoelaces, protecting the shoelace.  Telomeres protect chromosomes in the same way.  As a cell ages, its telomeres become shorter. Eventually, the telomeres become too short to allow cell replication, the cell stops dividing and will ultimately die – a normal biological process.

Telomere testing measures the ‘biological age’ of your cells.  It is one of the newest advancements in age management and anti-aging. It’s a simple blood test. Telomere testing determines the length of a person’s telomeres in relation to their age.

Evaluation of telomere length is an indicator of how rapidly one ages relative to a normal population. Therapies directed at slowing the loss of telomere length may slow aging and age-related diseases.  Therefore it has a role in any anti-aging/age management program.

Hormones & TelomeresHormones and Telomere Length
Scientists have found that telomerase, the enzyme that repairs and regulates telomeres, is controlled and activated by hormones.  Therefore, in order to keep ourselves healthy and with a high quality of life, I believe we must maintain all our hormones at optimal levels. Letting those hormones drop is to let the telomeres get short. When telomeres get short, cells age. Aging causes disease, and death follows.  Studies show that optimal levels of the hormones testosterone and estrogen levels help preserve telomere length.

Optimal Human Growth Hormone (HGH) levels are also associated with telomere length.  A 2009 study published by The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism looked at 2744 men and found that telomere length was positively associated with serum IGF-1 levels.  IGF-1 is the indirect measurement of Human Growth Hormone (HGH) in the body. This positive association is reassuring to me when it comes to optimizing HGH levels.

Nutrition & TelomereNutrition and Telomere Length
An inflammatory diet, or one that increases oxidative stress, will shorten telomeres faster. This includes refined carbohydrates, fast foods, processed foods, sodas, artificial sweeteners, trans fats and saturated fats. A diet with a large amount and variety of antioxidants that improves oxidative defense and reduces oxidative stress will slow telomere shortening. Consumption of 10 servings of fresh and relatively uncooked fruits and vegetables, mixed fiber, monounsaturated fats, omega-3 fatty acids, cold water fish, and high quality vegetable proteins will help preserve telomere length.

Lifestyle and Telomere Length
One should achieve ideal body weight and body composition with low body fat (less than 22 % for women and less than 16 % for men). Decreasing visceral fat is very important. Regular targeted aerobic and resistance exercise, using burst training to optimize human growth hormone release, sleeping for at least 8 hours per night to optimize hormones, stress reduction to optimize cortisol, and discontinuation of all tobacco products are strongly recommended.

NutritionNutritional Supplements and Telomere Length
Oxidative stress will shorten telomere length and cause aging in cellular tissue. Antioxidant supplements can potentially reduce oxidative stress very effectively, which will ultimately improve oxidative defenses, mitochondrial function, reduce inflammation and slow vascular aging. Targeted supplementation is key, as antioxidants work synergistically and must be balanced to work most effectively and avoid inducing a pro-oxidant effect. My favorite antioxidants are Alpha-Lipoic Acid, Melatonin, and Marine Krill Oil.

When Should Testing Be Considered?
I recommend testing once per year to evaluate the rate of aging and make adjustments in hormonal optimization, nutrition, nutritional supplements, weight management, exercise and other lifestyle modifications known to influence telomere length.

To learn more about telomere and micronutrient testing, please visit our website at www.spectracell.com.

Dr. Mike Carragher

 

Dr. Mike Carragher, M.D.- The Body Well

For more information about our client Dr. Carragher, please visit his blog or contact him at (323) 874-9355.

Topics: micronutrient testing, telomere length, Nutrition, telomere, telomere test, Hormones, Oxidative Stress, Aging, Dr. Mike Carragher

Nutritional Considerations of Women's Health

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Mon, Feb 13, 2012 @ 11:32 AM

Are you ready to achieve optimal health and reduce your risk of chronic diseases?

Your Health

Osteoporosis and WomenOSTEOPOROSIS
Good bone health is not as simple as getting enough calcium. In order to absorb calcium and reduce bone loss, proper vitamin D, K and C levels are crucial. Additionally, several vitamins and minerals are necessary for the prevention of osteoporosis as well as the painful bone disease, osteomalacia. Vitamin K is a major factor in building bone proteins while the amino acid carnitine can improve bone mineral density and zinc deficiency can negatively affect bone integrity.

PMS
Several symptoms of PMS are alleviated by specific nutrients and worsened by deficiencies. Since ovarian hormones influence calcium, magnesium and vitamin D metabolism, the evaluation of how each nutrient is functioning in a woman’s body reveals crucial information. In clinical trials, zinc has reduced and sometimes eliminated menstrual cramping; calcium and vitamin D can mitigate premenstrual headaches; and magnesium plus vitamin B6 supplementation can reduce the anxiety often felt in women suffering from PMS.

Women and HormonesHORMONES & HRT
The delicate balance of hormones is profoundly affected by nutritional deficiencies. Micronutrients can actually function as a hormone (vitamin D for example) or, in most cases, hormones are regulated by nutrients. Research shows that synthetic Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) can negatively affect mineral levels of calcium, copper, chromium, magnesium, selenium and zinc and certain vitamins, while reducing important antioxidants.

MENOPAUSE
Menopausal women are at a higher risk for micronutrient deficiencies. This is due largely to the fact that as we age, our bodies are less efficient at absorption, but also due to the oxidative stress that accompanies normal aging. As a woman enters menopause, her risk for cardiovascular disease also increases, partly because certain vitamins that protect against heart disease become deficient. For example, folic acid and B vitamin supplementation in women can help blood vessels remain pliable and clear while improving a woman’s lipid profile. In some women, high estrogen levels are associated with low magnesium levels, which consequently affect blood pressure and several negative menopausal symptoms.

BREAST CANCERWomen and Breast Cancer
Several key nutrients are critical for maintaining healthy breast tissue. Low antioxidant status is linked to higher rates of breast and other cancers. In fact, antioxidants such as coenzyme Q10, cysteine and vitamin A have been shown to mitigate DNA damage in cancerous tissue and inhibit hormonal toxicities that can initiate cancerous cells. Other studies have shown that adequate vitamin D and calcium levels can lower risk by more than 70%.

PREGNANCY
The demands for specific nutrients during pregnancy and lactation are particularly taxing on a mother, often draining her nutritional reserves. Since nutritional deficiencies can be passed from a mother to her baby, accurate and targeted diagnostic testing is important before, during and post-partum. Targeted supplementation may also reduce pregnancy complications: coenzyme Q10 and selenium reduce risk of pre-eclampsia, vitamin D can decrease bacterial infections, vitamin A and B2 can alleviate pregnancy anemia, trace elements can reduce pregnancy induced hypertension, and folic acid, biotin and B vitamins may help in the reduction of birth defects.

Reproductive HealthREPRODUCTIVE HEALTH
Overwhelming evidence suggests that infertility issues stem from low antioxidant status. Deficiencies in vitamins C and E, zinc, copper, magnesium, folate as well as the powerful antioxidant cysteine have been linked to infertility. In many cases, targeted repletion is very beneficial with fertility and related issues like endometriosis and polycystic ovary syndrome.

SpectraCell’s micronutrient testing assesses your vitamin, mineral and antioxidant deficiencies on the cellular level. This unique testing provides you with individualized results to determine what nutrients your body needs to reduce your risk of chronic diseases and live a healthier life.

Contact us at spec1@spectracell.com to learn more...

Topics: pregnancy, breast cancer, PMS, Hormones, Osteoporosis, HRT, Menopause, Reproductive Health, Women's Health

Understanding Obesity and Nutrition

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Mon, Jan 30, 2012 @ 10:22 AM

Obesity and NutritionIn the past, obesity was understood in fairly simple terms: excess body weight resulting from eating too much and exercising too little. Obesity is now regarded as a chronic medical disease with serious health implications caused by a complex set of factors.

Micronutrients and Obesity:

Obesity is a complex, chronic disease involving multiple components. It is the second leading cause of preventable death in America, second only to cigarette smoking, and increase the risk of illness from over 30 medical conditions including diabetes, hypertension, cancer, infertility, arthritis and heart disease. Prescription medications and procedures used to treat many of
these conditions often induce micronutrient deficiencies as well.

Availability of NutrientsAvailability of Nutrients:

Obesity often reduces the availability of certain nutrients. In a recent study, over 50% of obese patients were evaluated for Vitamin D status and found to be deficient. Since fat cells have
their own nutritional requirements, fat cells will draw from nutritional reserves in much the same way other organs do in order to perform normal cellular functions. The combination of reduced availability and increased demand for nutrients caused by excess fat cells ultimately causes multiple deficiencies that need to be corrected.

Regulation of Hormones Linked to Obesity:

Niacin (Vitamin B3) treatment has been shown to increase hormone levels that regulate metabolism of glucose and fatty acids. Decreased levels are associated with obesity and heart disease. Vitamin B5 helps breaks down fat cells so they can be used up by the body.

Low Zinc status is also associated with obesity. This may be due, in part, to the relationship between Zinc and leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite. Zinc depletion reduces leptin levels, while Zinc repletion reverses this effect.

Obesity and NutritionFat Cell Formation:

Studies suggest that a form of Vitamin E (tocotrienol) inhibits pre-fat cells from changing into mature fat cells, resulting in a decrease in body fat. Calcium intake has also been associated with weight loss through its ability to inhibit the formation of fat cells. It also promotes the oxidation, or burning of fat cells, therefore reducing the risk of obesity.

The Effect of Amino Acids on Body Composition:

Carnitine is an important nutrient that helps muscle cells utilize energy and burn calories. Evidence shows that supplementation with carnitine when combined with an exercise program may induce positive changes in body composition by reducing (belly fat) more efficiently than without supplementation. Glutamine has been shown to reduce fat mass and improve glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and the relatively unknown amino acid Asparagine can improve insulin sensitivity by increasing the amount of sugar taken into muscle tissue to be burned for fuel.

Obesity and Insulin Resistance - Partners in Crime:

Obesity severely impairs the body’s ability to efficiently burn dietary carbohydrates. This is caused primarily by the body’s inability to use insulin, which is the hormone that helps the transport of sugars into muscles where they can be used for fuel instead of being stored as fat. Optimal micronutrient and mineral status are necessary for proper insulin function.

Vascular Health and ObesityVascular Health in Obesity:

Blood vessels in overweight individuals are typically not as pliable and healthy as normal weight people. Vitamin C supplementation has been demonstrated to improve vascular function in overweight people. Similarly, minerals such as Magnesium, Zinc, Calcium and Copper have all shown positive effects on blood pressure and vascular health. Overweight people tend to have high blood pressure, which is intensified by vitamin deficiencies. Since so many nutrients (Folate, Biotin, Carnitine, Vitamins A, C, and E and several minerals) are involved in the maintenance of healthy blood vessels of both normal weight and overweight people, a comprehensive evaluation of how they are performing in the cells of obese patients is crucial.

Oxidative Stress and Inflammation:

Numerous studies link oxidative stress and inflammation with  obesity. Visceral adiposity (belly fat) is particularly high in dangerous enzymes that cause oxidative stress. Weight loss certainly counteracts this phenomenon and studies show that the amount of weight lost directly correlates to decreases in oxidative stress. Belly fat also causes inflammation of the liver, which is particularly common in obese people. One recent study  demonstrated that Coenzyme Q10 decreased obesity-induced inflammation of the liver. Similarly, inflammation in blood vessels of obese patients contributes to heart disease and stroke, which can be alleviated in part through proper antioxidant supplementation. It is imperative that antioxidant status be optimized, especially in obese patients. SpectraCell’s micronutrient testing measures several specific antioxidants and gives an overall picture of how well all the antioxidants are working together.

Malabsorption Issues After Bariatric SurgeryMalabsorption Issues After Bariatric Surgery:

The impaired ability to absorb nutrients after bariatric procedures routinely causes multiple vitamin and mineral deficiencies in patients. Due to fat malabsorption after bariatric surgery, deficiencies in fat soluble Vitamins (A, D, E and K) are extremely common. Neurological complications such as confusion, impaired muscle coordination, even seizures may occur after bariatric procedures, due to a lack of B Vitamins, especially Thiamine. These complications can occur acutely or decades later. A comprehensive evaluation of nutritional status in bariatric patients is critical in maintaining post-op health.

Also, share with us your experience with the role micronutrients have played in obesity with your patient population! Do you have a particular success?

Topics: Coenzyme Q10, Asparagine, zinc, folate, Vitamin D, Carnitine, Magnesium, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Vitamin A, Copper, Calcium, biotin, Glutamine, Vitamin B5, Hormones, Oxidative Stress, Insulin Resistance, Niacin, Obesity

The Role of Micronutrients in Sports Medicine

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Mon, Jan 16, 2012 @ 02:22 PM

AthleteSpectraCell has created an educational guide to discovering the important role micronutrients play in sports medicine.  In this guide, you will find information about:
  • Individualized nutrition for the athlete
  • Demand, synergy and balance of micronutrients
  • Muscle recovery and fatigue
  • Cellular energy production
  • Minimizing oxidative stress
  • Omega-3 fats for concussion protection
  • Immunity and hormone regulation in the athlete
Download a copy of this guide HERE.


Topics: micronutrient testing, Fatigue, Nutrition, immune system, Omega 3s, Hormones, Oxidative Stress, Athlete, Muscle recovery

The Role of Micronutrients in Breast Health

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Mon, Oct 10, 2011 @ 03:20 PM

Micronutrients and Breast HealthStart with the right building blocks...

Prevention is not simply earlier diagnosis. True prevention starts with your body's foundation - micronutrients.

The role of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants in cancer prevention are many - repairing cellular damage in breast tissue, preventing genetic mutations, killing pre-cancerous cells before they multiply and maintaining healthy hormonal balance. Evaluating micronutrient status on the cellular level is where true prevention occurs.

Micronutrients and Breast HealthEvery Woman is Biochemically Unique

Each woman is biochemically unique, and several factors affect her personal nutritional needs - age, lifestyle, metabolism, prescription drug usage, past and present illnesses, absorption rate, genetics and more.

SpectraCell's micronutrient testing measures 33 vitamins and minerals in your body and goes even further - it measures functional, long-term levels within the cell, and evaluates how well your body actually utilizes each nutrient - a more useful measure than the one-size fits all approach to nutrition.

Spectrox blurb resized 600

B Vitamins and Breast Tissue

B vitamins, especially folic acid, can prevent mutations in breast tissue which eventually become carcinogenic. They may also reduce tumors on women with existing breast cancer.

Micronutrients and Breast HealthThe Hormone - Nutrient Connection

Minerals, vitamins, antioxidants and metabolites interact closely with hormones. Improving estrogen metabolism, which is highly dependent on the availability of specific nutrients, reduces risk of many hormone related cancers, including breast cancer.

Research shows that hormone replacement therapy affects minerals such as calcium, copper, chromium, magnesium, selenium and zinc, while reducing important antioxidants like coenzyme Q10 which is needed for heart health. Adequate vitamin D and calcium levels can lower breast cancer risk by more than 70%.

The Micronutrient Test is for YOU

Just one micronutrient deficiency may compromise your ability to fight cancer at the cellular level and several nutrients are critical for maintaining healthy breast tissue. SpectraCell provides a comprehensive nutritional profile specific to YOU. The micronutrient test empowers you and your doctor to correct deficiencies, strengthening your body's foundation for a lifetime of wellness.

Whether you are a patient or a physician, speak to a representative today by calling our Client Services department at 800-227-5227 or emailing us at spec1@spectracell.com.

Micronutrient Testing and Breast Health

Topics: micronutrients, micronutrient testing, Cancer, B Vitamins, breast cancer, Cancer Prevention, Hormones, Spectrox, Free Radicals

SpectraCell's 2011 Educational Webinar Series

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Fri, Jan 21, 2011 @ 12:23 PM

2011 Webinar SeriesJoin SpectraCell's 2011 Educational Webinar Series Every 3rd Thursday of the Month

Topics:

  • February 17th - Using Advanced Diagnostic Tools for Cardiovascular Health by Peggy Watson, M.D.   REGISTER HERE...
  • March 17th - Case Study Review: Treating Your Most Common Patient Complaints by Ron Grabowski, R.D., D.C.   REGISTER HERE...
  • April 21st - Using Advanced Diagnostic Testing in a Concierge Practice by Shelena C. Lalji, M.D.   REGISTER HERE...
  • May 19th - Nutritional Considerations of Hormone Balance by Ron Grabowski, R.D., D.C.   REGISTER HERE...
  • June 16th - Clinical Implications of Vitamin D and Calcium Deficiencies by Ron Grabowski, R.D., D.C.   REGISTER HERE...

Time:

8pm eastern - 7pm central - 6pm mountain - 5pm pacific

REGISTER TODAY!

www.SpectraCell.com/Webinars

Topics: SpectraCell, micronutrient testing, Vitamin D, Cardiovascular Health, diagnostic tools, Calcium, deficiencies, Case Study, Hormones, Concierge Practice