SpectraCell Blog

What Makes SpectraCell's Micronutrient Test Unique?

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Fri, Jul 27, 2018 @ 03:03 PM

cells2-2The one-size-fits-all approach to health is outdated. So too is having to estimate nutrient adequacy, thanks to SpectraCell’s patented lab test. Our proprietary technology takes the guesswork out by offering a comprehensive intracellular micronutrient evaluation.

SpectraCell ALONE offers the technology that provides information about your personal micronutrient profile. It is NOT based on:

• Algorithms

• Assumptions

• Estimates

• Food diaries or food recalls

Here are the reasons that SpectraCell’s micronutrient test is truly unique – NO other test on the market offers this information:

1. Intracellular: In truth, “vitamin status” is somewhat of a loaded phrase because vitamins, like other micronutrients, exist both outside the cell (extracellular) and inside the cell (intracellular). Vitamin status outside a cell may be considered “within range” or “adequate” by conventional terms (e.g. when measured by standard lab testing), while vitamin status inside the cell – where metabolism actually occurs - may be depleted. Since vitamins function inside cells, extracellular measurements (such as serum testing) can be potentially misleading. Intracellular micronutrient levels, as opposed to what is present outside of cells (where it is not physiologically useful), is more clinically significant.

It is clear that serum micronutrient testing can yield important information. One obvious example is serum vitamin B12; when a person’s level is low, this can manifest as fatigue or anemia. Often, however, serum B12 may appear to be “normal,” but clinical symptoms of fatigue or B12 deficiency still exist. Why? Because serum B12 is a reflection of extracellular B12, whereas the intracellular reserve of B12 is what’s important; it matters little how much of a nutrient is present in one’s blood – if it is not getting into the cell, it won’t improve cellular or overall health. Consider this analogy: imagine being totally dehydrated, overwhelmed with thirst. If you jumped into a pool but could not drink the water, you remain thirsty because the water doesn’t make it into your body. Cells will be similarly starved if B12 doesn’t get assimilated.

2. Functional: Mass spectrometry, like other static quantitative measurement methods, assess the concentration of a nutrient present, but do not address its functional impact.  Measuring and reporting micronutrient concentration levels in the absence of a functional assessment offers an incomplete picture and can lead to inaccuracies in identifying and reporting true micronutrient deficiencies.

3. Lymphocyte-based: In our laboratory, we subject living white blood cells (obtained from a simple blood draw) to dozens of nutritional evaluation environments. Lymphocytes contain your complete genetic makeup, working coordinately – not just the gene subsets detected by other testing platforms – and are a reflection of long-term nutrient status and therefore, of cellular health throughout the body.

4. Long-term: The lifespan of these cells (4-6 months) means that taking a full range of supplements days or even weeks before your blood draw will not affect your results (serum micronutrient levels can fluctuate wildly on a daily basis). Your lymphocytes reflect your nutrient intake over a period of months, not days or hours.

5. Comprehensive: Nutrients work synergistically, so a comprehensive lab test is superior to measurement of individual micronutrients. SpectraCell’s micronutrient profile measures the functional level of 31 vitamins, minerals, amino acids, fatty acids, antioxidants, and metabolites so that patterns of deficiency are clear.

6. Proprietary: Only SpectraCell offers the patented Spectrox® (reflects antioxidant capacity) and Immunidex (a measure of immune system function) as part of the micronutrient profile.

So why has intracellular testing not replaced the serum variety? One simple reason is that serum testing has been used for so long that reference ranges are well established and understood, albeit potentially misleading. Another reason is that intracellular testing is more technologically advanced and fewer labs offer it. Finally, serum testing has been useful for detecting serious nutrient deficiencies that have progressed into obvious symptoms. But it is worth noting that intracellular testing helps detect deficiencies long before overt (and sometimes debilitating) symptoms occur –serum levels often fall in the “normal” range when a true intracellular deficiency exists. 

SpectraCell’s micronutrient test is a true intracellular test – NOT a serum measurement. 

For additional information and medical publications supporting intracellular testing over serum tests, click
here.

Find out your intracellular micronutrient status today!

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Topics: intracellular micronutrient status, Functional Micronutrient Testing, Advanced Nutritional Testing

One-Third of Americans Have at Least One Micronutrient Deficiency

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Tue, Sep 19, 2017 @ 04:03 PM

Using data from the government-sponsored research program National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a group of researchers compiled data on seven vitamins from over 15,000 people in the US. They determined that 31% of the American population is at risk for at least one vitamin deficiency; 23% of Americans are at risk for deficiency in at least two vitamins, and 6% are at risk for three or more vitamin deficiencies.

The data came from a variety of sources: dietary recall, reported supplement use, and lab results – some information less quantifiable than others. Researchers concluded that the most common vitamin deficiency in the United States is vitamin B6, of which a staggering 20% of Americans are deficient. However, scientists concede that biomarkers of nutrient status are affected by inflammation, suggesting that deficiency rates may be even higher. In addition, nutrient status did not correlate with dietary intake (according to their data), which is not surprising given that determining specific deficiencies via dietary intake is notoriously difficult to quantify. Dietary recall is rarely accurate; even if intake is measured with precision (this is difficult to do and therefore unlikely), absorption of said nutrients is an entirely different problem (itself nearly impossible to assess). A review of the available literature supports the view that a one-size-fits-all approach to micronutrient requirements is both outdated and inaccurate.  

The investigators stated that “sub-clinical deficiency symptoms for many vitamins and minerals are non-specific, and may include fatigue, irritability, aches and pains, decreased immune function, and heart palpitations,” all of which further complicate the quantification of micronutrient deficiency. Functional measurement of intracellular micronutrient status may gain attention as studies like this are published.

For details, click HERE for a link to the abstract. Read the full paper HERE.

Topics: micronutrient deficiency, vitamin B6 deficiency, sub-clinical deficiencies, Nutrition, micronutrient status, intracellular micronutrient status