SpectraCell Blog

Case Study: High Dose of Vitamin B1 Clears Up 26 Years of Painful Headaches

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Thu, Jul 12, 2018 @ 12:32 PM

headacheIn this case report, a 41-year-old man who had been suffering from cluster headache since the age of 15 years old was treated with high dose vitamin B1 (thiamine).  He had been diagnosed with cluster headache at a neurological center in Italy. His first headache occurred at age 15 shortly after a motorcycle accident and they increased in frequency over the years, with acute pain and intensity that significantly compromised his quality of life.  Although the patient would experience some headache free months over the years, in January 2016 the headache clusters began occurring daily with no pain-free period for an entire year.  The patient had been treated with sumatriptan, a commonly prescribed drug for cluster headache, which did not work.  He had also been prescribed prednisone, although this not alleviate the pain either.  In December 2016, he was given oral high dose vitamin B1.  Initially, the dose was 250mg, then it was increased to 750 mg after a few days.  Within 10 days, the headache pain disappeared.  He continued the vitamin B1 daily indefinitely.

Interestingly, the neurological center requested that he stop the vitamin B1 in order to test whether the headaches would come back.  He refused this request citing his reluctance to re-experience his headache pain.  However, in May 2017 (five months after B1 treatment started), the patient forgot his vitamin B1 while on a vacation.  Within 48 hours of the last dose, a painful headache occurred.   He resumed vitamin B1 therapy after his vacation and was able to reduce the dose to 500mg with no recurrence of headaches to date.

Cluster headache is a painful condition in which very severe headaches occur with little warning and in “clusters” meaning several headaches will occur in a short time period.  Patients of cluster headache have very little or no warning when they occur unlike migraine which may gradually build in intensity.  Classified as a neurological condition, cluster headache is characterized by very severe and intense pain around the eye, often on only one side of the head.  Some researchers suggest that the role vitamin B1 plays in energy metabolism, brain function and pain modulation make it a potential therapy for this rare neurological disorder.  

(Case Reports in Neurological Medicine, April 2018)

LINK to ABSTRACT Oral High-Dose Thiamine Improves the Symptoms of Chronic Cluster Headache.

LINK to FREE FULL TEXT

Topics: Vitamin B1 Deficiency, Vitamin B1, Vitamin B1 and Headaches, micronutrients, micronutrient deficiency, Headaches and Nutrition

One-Third of Americans Have at Least One Micronutrient Deficiency

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Tue, Sep 19, 2017 @ 04:03 PM

Using data from the government-sponsored research program National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a group of researchers compiled data on seven vitamins from over 15,000 people in the US. They determined that 31% of the American population is at risk for at least one vitamin deficiency; 23% of Americans are at risk for deficiency in at least two vitamins, and 6% are at risk for three or more vitamin deficiencies.

The data came from a variety of sources: dietary recall, reported supplement use, and lab results – some information less quantifiable than others. Researchers concluded that the most common vitamin deficiency in the United States is vitamin B6, of which a staggering 20% of Americans are deficient. However, scientists concede that biomarkers of nutrient status are affected by inflammation, suggesting that deficiency rates may be even higher. In addition, nutrient status did not correlate with dietary intake (according to their data), which is not surprising given that determining specific deficiencies via dietary intake is notoriously difficult to quantify. Dietary recall is rarely accurate; even if intake is measured with precision (this is difficult to do and therefore unlikely), absorption of said nutrients is an entirely different problem (itself nearly impossible to assess). A review of the available literature supports the view that a one-size-fits-all approach to micronutrient requirements is both outdated and inaccurate.  

The investigators stated that “sub-clinical deficiency symptoms for many vitamins and minerals are non-specific, and may include fatigue, irritability, aches and pains, decreased immune function, and heart palpitations,” all of which further complicate the quantification of micronutrient deficiency. Functional measurement of intracellular micronutrient status may gain attention as studies like this are published.

For details, click HERE for a link to the abstract. Read the full paper HERE.

Topics: micronutrient deficiency, vitamin B6 deficiency, sub-clinical deficiencies, Nutrition, micronutrient status, intracellular micronutrient status

The Importance of Micronutrient Testing by Dr. Ron Grabowski, DC, RD

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Tue, Mar 21, 2017 @ 02:34 PM

 

 

Hear Dr. Grabowski’s take on the value of intracellular micronutrient testing, and how micronutrient deficiencies can reflect patterns seen in a variety of diseases.


 

Topics: micronutrient testing, micronutrient deficiency, Nutritional Deficiency

Folic Acid Deficiency Exacerbates Damage From Stroke

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Tue, Jan 24, 2017 @ 12:04 PM

stroke.jpgPrevious studies have linked low folic acid with an increased risk of ischemic stroke (stroke caused by oxygen deprivation) but new research sheds light on how damage occurs. In this animal study, scientists demonstrated that after a stroke, brain tissue is damaged both from lack of oxygen and through the prolonged activation of autophagy, a process whose function is to degrade dysfunctional parts of a cell. When folic acid is deficient, autophagy is accelerated to the point where nerve cells die, thus exacerbating damage to the brain after an initial stroke.

For more details, download the abstract entitled Folic acid deficiency increases brain cell injury via autophagy enhancement after focal cerebral ischemia.



 

Topics: Folic Acid, Folic Acid and Strokes, Folic Acid Deficiency, micronutrients, micronutrient deficiency, Reducing Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, Stroke Prevention

The Good and Bad News About Chromium and Blood Sugar

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Thu, Dec 01, 2016 @ 11:01 AM

broccoli.jpgChromium is a trace metal that plays a role in metabolizing carbohydrates.  It is the central molecule of glucose tolerance factor (GTF), a compound that helps insulin attach to a cell’s receptors. This allows glucose to be taken up by a cell and used for fuel, rather than continue circulating in the bloodstream and eventually wreaking havoc on blood vessels and organs. 

When chromium is deficient in the body, glucose cannot be metabolized properly. This sets the stage for insulin resistance. The good news is that when a chromium deficiency is corrected, blood sugar regulation improves. Unfortunately, supplemental chromium, such as chromium picolinate, may not be absorbed efficiently. Chromium competes for the binding site of a protein that transports iron, which may also inhibit absorption. The solution? Increase your dietary intake of chromium-containing foods. Among the best sources of this mineral are broccoli, barley, oats, and green beans. You’ll want to limit your intake of foods high in simple sugars, on the other hand, as these actually increase the rate of excretion, thus promoting chromium deficiency.

Find out whether you are chromium deficient today by asking about our Micronutrient Test


 

Topics: Chromium, micronutrients, super foods, broccoli, barley, oats, green beans, chromium picolinate, blood sugar, micronutrient deficiency, chromium deficiency, micronutrient testing, micronutrient profile