SpectraCell Blog

Vital to Victory: Micronutrient Requirements for Athletes

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, Jun 21, 2017 @ 01:25 PM

From a nutritional standpoint, the athlete’s focus should include both macronutrients – protein for muscle rebuilding, carbohydrates for energy renewal, fats for nerve function – as well as the critically important micronutrients – which are the vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and amino acids your body needs to function optimally every day and over a lifetime.

Hear Dr. Grabowski’s take on the role of micronutrients in sports nutrition.

Above all, we are all biochemically unique, and several factors affect our personal micronutrient needs - age, lifestyle, intensity of physical training, prescription drug usage, past and present illness or injuries, absorption rate, genetics and more. The “normal” amount of each micronutrient varies from athlete to athlete, and even in the same athlete depending on circumstances in his or her life.

SpectraCell’s Micronutrient test measures 33 vitamins and minerals in your body, but goes even further – it measures functional, long-term levels within the cell, which means SpectraCell’s micronutrient test not only identifies deficiencies but is also a valuable tool in predicting health concerns before overt symptoms occur. How's that for a test?! 
 
That said, YOU ARE WHAT YOU ABSORB - not just what you eat. Find out whether your supplements are really working and how you can improve your absorption and performance today. To learn more about the role of micronutrients in sports nutrition, click here
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Topics: micronutrients, Muscle recovery, Sports Performance, Nutrition and Sports Performance, Endurance Athletes, Crossfit, Athletic Performance, Sports Nutrition, XFIT, Sports Medicine

Serum vs. Intracellular Micronutrient Status

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Thu, Jun 08, 2017 @ 02:58 PM

cells2-1.jpgKnowing one’s vitamin status can be incredibly empowering when it comes to health. In truth, “vitamin status” is somewhat of a loaded phrase because vitamins, like other micronutrients, exist both outside the cell (extracellular) and inside the cell (intracellular). Vitamin status outside a cell may be considered “within range” or “adequate” by conventional terms (e.g. when measured by standard lab testing), while vitamin status inside the cell – where metabolism actually occurs - may be depleted. Since vitamins function inside cells, extracellular measurements (such as serum testing) can be potentially misleading. Intracellular micronutrient levels, as opposed to what is present outside of cells (where it is not physiologically useful), is more clinically significant.

It is clear that serum micronutrient testing can yield important information. One obvious example is serum vitamin B12; when a person’s level is low, this can manifest as fatigue or anemia. Often, however, serum B12 may appear to be “normal,” but clinical symptoms of fatigue or B12 deficiency still exist. Why? Because serum B12 is a reflection of extracellular B12, whereas the intracellular reserve of B12 is what’s important; it matters little how much of a nutrient is present in one’s blood – if it is not getting into the cell, it won’t improve cellular or overall health. Consider this analogy: imagine being totally dehydrated, overwhelmed with thirst. If you jumped into a pool but could not drink the water, you remain thirsty because the water doesn’t make it into your body. Cells will be similarly starved if B12 doesn’t get assimilated.

So why has intracellular testing not replaced the serum variety? One simple reason is that serum testing has been used for so long that reference ranges are well established and understood, albeit potentially misleading. Another reason is that intracellular testing is more technologically advanced and fewer labs offer it. Finally, serum testing has been useful for detecting serious nutrient deficiencies that have progressed into obvious symptoms. But it is worth noting that intracellular testing helps detect deficiencies long before overt (and sometimes debilitating) symptoms occur –serum levels often fall in the “normal” range when a true intracellular deficiency exists.

SpectraCell’s micronutrient test is a true intracellular test – NOT a serum measurement. Find out your intracellular micronutrient status today!

For additional information and medical publications supporting intracellular testing over serum tests, click HERE.


 

Topics: micronutrients, micronutrient testing, Intracellular Analysis, micronutrient status, Serum Testing, Vitamin Status, extracellular vs. intracellular, integrative medicine, precision medicine

The Role of Micronutrient Deficiencies in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Fri, May 05, 2017 @ 11:27 AM

ADHD.jpgAttention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has become an increasingly prevalent condition, afflicting children, adolescents, and adults. Some hallmarks of this brain disorder include an inability to focus and/ or a failure to see projects/ activities to completion. Unbeknownst to most, ADHD can be exacerbated by micronutrient deficiencies. Evidence of the relationship between micronutrient status and ADHD-associated behaviors is compelling; the list below represents some examples of the micronutrient status-ADHD connection: 

Vitamin B6: Evidence suggests that high-dose supplementation of B6 is as effective as Ritalin for ADHD, probably due to its role in raising serotonin levels.

Folate (AKA Vitamin B9): Low maternal folate status during pregnancy has been linked to hyperactivity in children. Persons with the MTHFR (methyl tetrahydrafolate reductase) polymorphism are predisposed to folate deficiency, and are more likely to have ADHD.

Magnesium: A deficiency in this micronutrient is linked to poor functioning of the neurotransmitters that control emotion, social reactions, hyperactivity, and attention. Magnesium has a synergistic effect with vitamin B6.

Zinc: This nutrient is a cofactor required for the synthesis of dopamine, which impacts mood and concentration. Low zinc depresses both melatonin and serotonin production; this affects behavior and one’s ability to process information.

Carnitine: Reduces hyperactivity and improves social behavior in people with ADHD via its role in fatty acid metabolism. Some consider carnitine a safe alternative to stimulant drugs.

Serine: Administration of phosphatidylserine in conjunction with omega-3 fatty acids improved ADHD symptoms (attention scores) significantly more than omega-3 fatty acids alone, suggesting a synergistic effect. Phosphatidylserine increases dopamine levels.

Glutamine: A precursor to GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), the calming neurotransmitter that affects mood, focus, and hyperactivity. Disruption of glutamine-containing neurotransmission systems may cause ADHD. 

Choline: A precursor to acetylcholine, the neurotransmitter that regulates memory, focus, and muscle control (hyperactivity). 

Antioxidant status: Oxidative imbalance is prevalent in ADHD patients and likely plays a causative role. Glutathione, a very potent antioxidant, is commonly deficient in ADHD.

To evaluate your micronutrient status, order your micronutrient test today!

For a copy of SpectraCell's nutrient correlation wheel on ADHD, click here.

 

Topics: micronutrients, Nutrition, ADHD, micronutrient deficiencies in ADHD, mental health in children, micronutrient status

The Role of Micronutrient Testing in Conjunction with Standard Lab Tests by Ron Grabowski, DC, RD

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Thu, Apr 13, 2017 @ 03:40 PM

Listen to Dr. Grabowski’s take on uncovering nutrient deficiencies to help explain the results of commonly ordered panels. 

 



 

Topics: micronutrients, micronutrient testing, nutrient deficiencies, standard lab testing

Nutrient Interactions: An Important Consideration of Intracellular Analysis

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, Apr 05, 2017 @ 02:54 PM

Hear Dr. Grabowski’s take on the value of intracellular micronutrient testing, and how nutrient-nutrient interactions are a critical component in designing an effective therapeutic supplementation plan. 

 

 


 

Topics: micronutrients, Intracellular Analysis, Nutrient Interactions, Supplmentation

Feeling Fabulous or Fatigued?  (Hint – it’s all in your cells!)

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, Mar 29, 2017 @ 12:30 PM

healthy woman.jpgCellular health – whether referring to brain cells, bone cells, or fat cells – impacts the health of the entire body. Health issues may arise and manifest differently for each person depending on one’s unique biochemistry. Some common examples of these manifestations include excess weight, headaches, and dry skin, driven by poor cellular metabolism. Quite literally, health and wellness begin at the cellular level. 

A paradigm shift in women’s healthcare is happening right now.  You may have noticed that much of the focus in medicine today has shifted from disease to prevention; however, what we commonly think of as “preventive” medicine (mammograms, PAP smears) is actually pre-symptomatic screening for earlier disease detection and diagnosis.  Prevention can be facilitated by the optimal nourishment of cells with micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants), as these fuel the cell and are involved in hundreds of metabolic reactions and physiological process. Some of these include detoxification, energy production, neurotransmitter balance, sleep quality, cognition, and immunity. Therefore, micronutrients profoundly affect mood, skin, hormone balance – every organ, endocrine, and body system is impacted. In fact, the nutrient-hormone connection is huge.  Did you know that many female cancers – breast, uterine, ovarian – may occur when estrogen is metabolized into toxic by-products that are not eliminated? To keep estrogen metabolism in the body safe, women are encouraged to focus on these micronutrients:

  • Magnesium activates the enzyme that removes toxic forms of estrogen.
  • Vitamin B6 protects genes from estrogen-induced damage.
  • Vitamin B3 increases adiponectin, a weight loss hormone.
  • Vitamin A regulates leptin, a hormone that suppresses appetite.
  • Cysteine prevents toxins in breast tissue from becoming cancerous.

These nutrients and dozens others behave like hormonal housekeepers, and lacking even one of these can set the stage for compromised health: vitamin deficiency can manifest as fairly benign conditions (lack of energy or poor sleep), or more serious illness (allowing the uncontrolled growth of cancerous cells to grow and invade healthy tissue).

Because we are all biochemically unique, micronutrient deficiencies may lead to different symptoms in different women. Find out yours, and take steps to correct them, by taking your micronutrient test today.

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Topics: micronutrients, vitamin deficiencies, intracellular, Women's Health, Cellular Health, nutrient deficiencies, estrogen metabolism, Nutrient-Hormone Connection

Vitamin A Deficiency in Utero May Increase Risk of Alzheimer's Later in Life

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Mon, Mar 27, 2017 @ 12:26 PM

old man.jpgIn this provocative mouse study, researchers demonstrated that marginal vitamin A deficiency in utero may have large implications on cognitive function later in life, particularly in the development of Alzheimer's disease. It revealed that vitamin A deficiency increases the potential for amyloid beta to form in the brain, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid beta is a type of protein that forms tangles in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, eventually leading to plaque formation and ultimately manifesting as major cognitive dysfunction and severe memory loss.

Specifically, amyloid precursor protein (generally benign when it stays intact) becomes amyloid beta when it is acted upon by a special enzyme that cleaves it. Vitamin A deficiency increases the activity of this enzyme, thus increasing the production of amyloid beta in the brain. When therapeutic doses of vitamin A was administered to mice, memory was restored, suggesting that “vitamin A supplementation might be a potential approach for Alzheimer’s disease prevention and treatment.” 

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Topics: micronutrients, Vitamin A, Vitamin A and Alzheimer's, Vitamin A Deficiency, Alzheimer's Disease

Study Sheds Light on How Omega-3 fatty Acids Minimize Cellular Aging

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Thu, Mar 23, 2017 @ 12:52 PM

omega3-foods-720x480.jpgThe role of omega-3 fatty acids in health has been well established, and new research helps explain the association. In a recent study, mice given fish oil containing high amounts of omega-3 fatty acids (especially DHA) demonstrated the activation of several cellular “protections:” (1) the activity of protective enzymes in the liver and heart tissue increased significantly; (2) oxidative stress (as measured by F2-isoprostanes) and damage to sensitive brain tissue (cerebral lipid peroxidation) were dramatically decreased; (3) telomere shortening in the liver and testes was reduced; and (4) DHA helped prevent the expression of cancer-causing genes. Researchers suggest communication that links oxidative stress, telomeres, and cancer genes into what they call a “redox-telomere-antioncogene axis.”

DOWNLOAD ABSTRACT


 

Topics: micronutrients, Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Omega-3 and Aging

Functional Indicators of Zinc Status Are More Telling Than Plasma Levels

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, Mar 15, 2017 @ 12:45 PM

zinc food sources.jpegEighteen healthy adult men participated in a six-week controlled consumption study, in which all food or beverage they consumed was provided for them over the course of the study. For the first two weeks, the men were given food with very low amounts of zinc plus a chemical (phytate) that reduces zinc absorption. Then the amount of zinc in their prepared food was increased by over 60%. Measures of zinc status – both functional and static – were taken at the beginning and end of the trial. After the increase in dietary zinc, plasma levels remained the same. However, functional measures of zinc status increased. Specifically, total absorbed zinc as well as serum levels of protective proteins involved in cellular repair increased. Over a thousand proteins were measured, and those that increased in function were proteins that help repair DNA damage and quell inflammation, many of which are zinc-dependent. Although plasma zinc remained the same, functional indicators of zinc status improved after an increase in zinc consumption. 


 

Topics: micronutrients, zinc, Zinc Deficiency, Functional Zinc Status

Supplemental Calcium Linked to Dementia in Certain Women

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Tue, Mar 07, 2017 @ 12:42 PM

dementia.jpgA study followed 700 Swedish women between the ages of 70 and 92 years, who were all initially free from dementia. After five years, the researchers collected data on which women took calcium supplements (and dosage), as well as which women were clinically diagnosed with dementia. The odds among women who took supplemental calcium of developing dementia were twice that for women who did not take calcium. Further, among the women with a history of stroke, the odds of developing dementia among those who also supplemented calcium were six times the odds compared to women who did not take calcium. Although limited in sample size, the study results suggest that in elderly women, calcium supplementation may be potentially harmful, especially if they have a history of stroke or vascular problems.

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Topics: micronutrients, Calcium, Calcium and Dementia, Dementia