SpectraCell Blog

The Endocrine Disorder in America NO ONE is Talking About

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Thu, Jan 22, 2015 @ 09:16 AM

thyroid resized 600There are currently about 25 million Americans diagnosed with some sort of thyroid disorder.  Thyroid disorders tend to be more prominent in women and the probability of a thyroid disorder occurring is four times more likely in women than in men. 

 

What exactly is the thyroid?

  • A butterfly shaped gland in the neck
  • Makes T3 , T4 and calcitonin (calcium regulating hormone)

Symptoms of a Thyroid disorder

  • Weight gain, even though you are not eating more food.
  • Increased sensitivity to cold.
  • Constipation.
  • Muscle weakness.
  • Joint or muscle pain.
  • Depression.
  • Fatigue (feeling very tired)
  • Pale dry skin.

Watch SpectraCell's webinar on
Integrative Diagnostics for Managing the Thyroid HERE                                                  

Topics: SpectraCell, Thyroid, weakness, Hormones, Weight Gain, endocrine disorder

A Look at Carnitine

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Mon, Apr 14, 2014 @ 03:37 PM

anatomy of nutrition blank resized 600

L-carnitine is an amino acid derivative of the essential amino acids L-lysine and methonine. The conversion to carnitine requires niacin (B3), vitamins B6 and C, and iron.  It is found in nearly all cells of the body but chiefly in the liver and kidney.  Carnitine is essential for the transportation of long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membranes in the mitochondria, where they are metabolized by beta-oxidation to produce biological energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate (ATP).

L- carnitine also is required to remove short- and medium-chain fatty acids from the mitochondria.  This removal optimized energy production by maintaining coenzyme A at optimal levels for normal metabolism and energy production.

Deficiency Symptoms:

Deficiencies of carnitine may result from 1) deficiencies of essential amino acids lysine and methionine, 2) deficiencies of cofactors (B3, C, B6 and iron), 3) defective gastrointestinal function, 4) increased requirement because of high-fat diet, metabolic stress or disease.  The consequences of carnitine deficiency are impaired lipid metabolism and lipid accumulation in skeletal muscles, heart and liver. Patients usually exhibit muscle weakness and fatigue.

Normal heart function depends on adequate concentrations of carnitine.  While the normal heart stores more carnitine than required, if the heart does not have a good oxygen supply, carnitine levels quickly decrease.  This lack of oxygen leads to decreased energy production and increased risk for angina and heart disease.  Carnitine benefits blood lipids by lowering triglycerides and total cholesterol, while increasing HDL.  L-acetylcarnitine (LAC) may be useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, senile depression and age-related memory loss.

Download the nutrient correlation chart on Fibromyalgia, Pain and Testosterone all include a deficiency in carnitine.

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Topics: SpectraCell, Carnitine, Vitamins, deficiency, micronutrient test, micronutrient, vitamin deficiencies, weakness

How important IS vitamin B1(Thiamin)?

Posted by SpectraCell Laboratories, Inc. on Wed, Aug 07, 2013 @ 10:15 AM

Vitamin B1(thiamin) is a water-soluble vitamin of the 8 B complex vitamin B1(thiamin)vitamins. All B vitamins help the body convert food (carbohydrates) into fuel (glucose), which is used to produce energy. The B vitamins, also help the body metabolize fats and protein. B complex vitamins are needed for healthy skin, hair, eyes, and liver. They also help the nervous system function properly, and are needed for good brain function.

Vitamin B1(Thiamin) is used by cells to help make energy from foodstuffs. Thiamin pyrophosphate is a cofactor for dehydrogenase enzymes with key roles in cellular energy production.  Thiamin pyrophosphate is required for transketolase activity, which is a component of the pentose phosphate pathway, the sole source for the synthesis of ribose used in synthesis of the nucleic acids (DNA and RNA).  These reactions also produce the major source of cellular NADPH (used in fatty acid biosynthesis and other pathways). Thiamin triphosphate is localized in nerve cell membranes, and plays a role in transmission of nervous impulses and acetylcholine synthesis.

Deficiency symptoms:

Early vitamin B1(thiamin) deficiency leads to clinical signs of:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Irritability
  • Fatigue
  • Constipation
  • Mental depression
  • Nausea
  • Peripheral Neuropathy 

Clinical signs of more severe thiamin deficiency (Wernicke-Korsafoff Syndrome):

  • Mental confusion
  • Loss of eye coordination
  • Loss of fine motor control
  • Weakness

Those at risk for vitamin B1(Thiamin) deficiency include:

  • Patients suffering from malnutrition, starvation or malabsorptin syndromes
  • Alcoholics
  • Patients on restricted diets
  • Gastric partitioning surgery
  • Thiamin-Responsive
  • Prolonged hemodialysis (pregnancy, lactation, fever, infection, trauma)
  • Elderly
  • Patients with an increased metabolic rate
  • Inherited
  • Metabolic Disorders

Repletion Information:

Dietary sources richest in B1 (per serving) include:

  • Nutritional supplements
  • Rice Bran
  • Pork enriched grain & grain products (cereals)
  • Nutritional Yeasts
  • Wheat Germ
  • Legumes (beans, peas, soybeans, lentils
Download SpectraCell's nutrition correlation reference chart referencing Vitamin B1(Thiamin)'s role in Fibromyalgia, Insomnia and Pain.
View our webinar on "Nutritional Considerations of Fibromyalgia" which discusses vitamin B1 as well as many other nutrients that play a vital role in fibromyalgia.

For more information on how to check your vitamin levels click here.

Topics: SpectraCell, B Vitamins, Fatigue, DNA, Case Study, Diet, Nervous System, Vitamin B1, skin disorder, reference chart, loss of appetite, constipation, nausea, irritability, weakness, mental confusion, thiamin